Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Ability to Share Forward

Adult Education

Adult Education refers to buildings used primarily for providing adult students with continuing education, workforce development, or professional development outside of the college or university setting.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, administrative space, conference rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, cafeterias, auditoriums, stairways, atriums, elevator shafts, and storage areas.

Alert Metrics

You can use the following Alerts to spot check your properties for the most common errors that cause metrics to show as "N/A."
  • Data Center does not have an IT Meter - If you have a Data Center, then you need to also have an IT Meter. This alert will flag any properties missing the required IT Meter.
  • Gross Floor Area is 0 ft2 – Your property Gross Floor Area must be larger than 0 ft2.
  • Individual monthly meter entry is more than 65 days long – If any of your individual monthly meter entries is over 65 days, then you will not be able to get Weather Normalized Metrics.
  • Meter has overlaps – An overlap is where the same date is covered by multiple bills.
  • Meter has gaps - A gap is where a date(s) is NOT covered by your bills.
  • Meter has less than 12 full calendar months of data – 12 full months of calendar data is required for all metrics. A “full month” includes the first and last days of that month. If your bills run from mid-month to mid-month, you will need 13 bills to equal "12 full calendar months."
  • No meter are associated with this property – This means you haven't told Portfolio Manager which meters to use towards your metrics. You can associate meters from the Meters tab, click on "View/Edit Configuration."
  • Property has no uses – Each property must have at least one Property Use (ex: Office, Retail, K-12 School). You can create one at the top of the Details tab.

Ambulatory Surgical Center

Ambulatory Surgery Centers refers to health care facilities that provide same-day surgical care, including diagnostic and preventive procedures.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, operating and recovery rooms, waiting rooms, employee break rooms and kitchens, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.

Amount of Laundry Processed Onsite Annually

The Amount of Laundry Processed Onsite Annually is the total quantity of laundry that is processed every year. The quantity is expressed as a weight (e.g., kg) and should be a combined weight reflecting both linen and terry, if appropriate. You should include all laundry processed, including laundry processed on behalf of other businesses (e.g., a hotel serving as a district laundry processing center).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Application Primary Contact

Approximate Pool Size

Approximate Pool Size is the size of either indoor or outdoor heated swimming pools. Many pools have unique/nonstandard shapes. You should select the size that is closest to your pool’s size.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Aquarium

Aquarium refers to buildings used to provide aquatic habitat primarily to live animals and which may include public or private viewing areas and educational programs.

Gross Floor area should include public and restricted areas such as visitor walkways, tank space, retail areas, restaurants, laboratories, classrooms, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. Areas not in enclosed buildings, such as outdoor habitats, open-air theaters, walkways, and landscaped areas should not be included in the Gross Floor Area.

Automobile Dealership

Automobile Dealership refers to buildings used for the sale of new or used cars and light trucks.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, offices, conference rooms, vehicle service centers, parts storage areas, waiting rooms, staff break rooms, hallways, and stairwells. Gross Floor Area should not include any exterior spaces such as vehicle parking areas.

Average Effluent Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5)

Average Effluent Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5) is the BOD5 concentration of wastewater after it is treated and is leaving a Wastewater Treatment Plant. The concentration should be an average concentration, estimated over a 12-month period. BOD is the measure of the amount of oxygen required by bacteria for stabilizing material that can be decomposed under aerobic conditions. BOD5 is a commonly used determinant of the organic strength of a waste, recording the oxygen demand over a five-day period. BOD5 should be reported in mg/l.

BOD5 is not the same as CBOD5 (carbonaceous biological oxygen demand). To receive an ENERGY STAR score, you must report BOD5, not CBOD5, for your wastewater treatment plant.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Average Flow

Average Flow is the total average daily flow of water through a Water Treatment and Distribution Plant or Wastewater Treatment Plant. Specifically:
  • Water Treatment and Distribution Plants - This daily flow rate includes all sources of water through the plant, including ground water, surface water, and purchased water. This value is provided via a Plant Flow Rate Meter, through which you can update flow rates regularly (quarterly, monthly, daily, etc.).
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant - This value is the average daily flow of wastewater into the plant. It is provided via a Plant Flow Rate Meter, through which you can update flow rates regularly (quarterly, monthly, daily, etc.).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Average Influent Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5)

Average Influent Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5) is the BOD5 concentration of wastewater when it is entering a Wastewater Treatment Plant to be treated. The concentration should be an average concentration, estimated over a 12-month period. BOD is the measure of the amount of oxygen required by bacteria for stabilizing material that can be decomposed under aerobic conditions. BOD5 is a commonly used determinant of the organic strength of a waste, recording the oxygen demand over a five day period. BOD5 should be reported in mg/l.

BOD5 is not the same as CBOD5 (the carbonaceous biological oxygen demand). To receive an ENERGY STAR score, you must report BOD5, not CBOD5, for your wastewater treatment plant.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Average Number of Residents

The Average Number of Residents is the average number of residents that occupied the property for the previous 12 months. Residents should only include those who live at the property, and should not include any employees or any visitors.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Average Occupancy

Occupancy is the percentage of your property’s Gross Floor Area (GFA) that is occupied and operational. For example, if you have a 10 story office building, that on average has 9 of its 10 floors fully leased and occupied, the occupancy would be 90%. There is only one Occupancy rate for each property as a whole.

You enter your Occupancy when you first create the property, and you can change it on the Details tab. Here are instructions for what to do when your occupancy fluctuates.

The value you enter for occupancy will not affect your ENERGY STAR Score or any other metrics. Your Score is based on your specific Use Details (Number of Workers, Computers, etc). So, when you have changes to occupancy/vacancy in your property, you need to update your Use Details to accurately reflect the activity at your property.

The value you enter for occupancy could affect your eligibility for ENERGY STAR certification. We have the following minimum occupancy requirements:

  • Office/Bank/Courthouse/Financial Center – 50%
  • Hotel - 55%
  • Multifamily – 75%
If you are not seeking certification for one of the above property types, you may not find Occupancy very useful (though it is required, so enter a good guess and move on). But, you may find it helpful to compare properties with different occupancy levels across your portfolio using custom reports.

Today, you enter a single occupancy rate, but you cannot track changes over time or see values from previous years. However, the ability to track values over time is on our “wish list” of possible enhancements and when built you will be able to compare your occupancy rate with your energy/water usage for each property.

Avoided and Net Emissions

Avoided Emissions and Net Emissions provide two related characterizations of the emissions benefit associated with green power.

  • Avoided Emissions - Avoided emissions are the emissions benefits associated with green power use. Avoided emissions may be either onsite or offsite.
    • Onsite Avoided Emissions occur when you have an onsite renewable electric system and you retain the rights to the Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), which convey/define the environmental benefits of your system. This is the avoided emissions effectively resulting from your onsite system.
    • Offsite Avoided Emissions occur when you purchase green power from your utility or an independent supplier and you own the claims to the RECs. This is the avoided emissions effectively resulting from a green power purchase from your utility or independent supplier. Offsite Avoided Emissions also occur in the case of REC arbitrage, a transaction where you sell the RECs associated with your own onsite system and purchase other substitute RECs. In this case, the avoided emissions associated with your green power originate from offsite sources, not your onsite system.
  • Net Emissions - Net emissions are equal to your property's GHG emissions minus the Offsite Avoided Emissions. Under standard GHG accounting protocol, your first step is always to compute your starting emissions inventory. This inventory will count electricity consumption from onsite systems as having zero emissions and will count electricity consumption of utility green power purchases as having the same emissions as non-green power (i.e. standard electric) purchases. This inventory is your basic starting point. Then, you have a separate line item to account for your Offsite Avoided Emissions. The Offsite Avoided Emissions are subtracted from your basic inventory to yield your Net Emissions. Please note that you do not subtract the Onsite Avoided Emissions to get this net value, because they have already been counted as zero emissions in your starting inventory.

Award Recipient

Back to Top

B

Bank Branch

Bank Branch refers to a commercial banking outlet that offers banking services to walk-in customers.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including banking areas, vaults, lobbies, atriums, kitchens used by staff, conference rooms, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Bar/Nightclub

Bar/Nightclub refers to buildings used primarily for social/entertainment purposes, and is characterized by most of the revenue being generated from the sale of beverages instead of food.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including standing/seating areas, stage/dressing room areas, food/drink preparation or kitchen areas, retail areas, bathrooms, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Properties whose primary business revenues are generated from the sale of food should be entered using one of the Restaurant property uses, even if there is a bar.

Barracks

Barracks refers to residential buildings associated with military facilities or educational institutions which offer multiple accommodations for long-term residents.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including bedrooms, common areas, food service facilities, laundry facilities, meeting spaces, exercise rooms, health club/spas, lobbies, elevator shafts, storage areas, and stairways.

Basic Property Information

Basic Property Information includes the property name, address, gross floor area, Property IDs, and federal data (if applicable).

Biomass Emissions

See GHG Emissions.

Bowling Alley

Bowling alley refers to buildings used for public or private, recreational or professional bowling.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including bowling lanes, concession areas, party rooms, retail areas, administrative/office space, employee break rooms, storage areas, and mechanical rooms.
Back to Top

C

Casino

Casino refers to buildings primarily used to conduct gambling activities including both electronic and live table games.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including the main casino floor/gaming area, restaurants/bars, retail areas, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

If your Casino is located in the same building as a hotel, we recommend that you enter a separate hotel property use.

Change in EUI For Energy Projects

Change in EUI for an Energy Project compares the EUI value before and after an energy upgrade (or series of upgrades). You can select the pre- and post- periods you would like to compare. As a staring default Portfolio Manager will set these periods according to your date of completion. For example, if you have an project with a completion date of March 15, 2011, then your change will compare the EUI for the 12 months before the implementation date of your project (March 2010 to February 2011) to the 12 months after your project (April 2011 to March 2012). Please note that other energy projects and/or changes in operation may have occurred during this time. EPA does not attempt to estimate the effect of a single energy project controlling for all other changes.

Child Property

College/University

College/University refers to buildings used for the purpose of higher education. This includes public and private colleges and universities.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, laboratories, offices, cafeterias, maintenance facilities, arts facilities, athletic facilities, residential areas, storage rooms, restrooms, elevator shafts, and stairways.

Completely Enclosed Parking Garage Size

Completely Enclosed Parking Garage Size is the total area of a parking structure that is completely enclosed on all four sides and has a roof. This includes an underground parking structure or a fully enclosed structure on the first few stories of a building.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Computer Lab

Computer Lab is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – Indicates that there is a Computer Lab, which refers to a room or set of rooms specifically designed and equipped with at least 10 computers and associated peripherals, such as printers, for the use of the occupants. Typically, such spaces are separated by walls and doors and have their own temperature and humidity control.
  • No – Indicates that the property does not contain a Computer Lab.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Congratulations Letter

If your application for an ENERGY STAR certification is approved, a Congratulations Letter will be sent to the contact selected during the application process. Included in the letter is information regarding receipt of ENERGY STAR certification.

Connected Contacts

Your “Connected” contacts are those that you’ve made a connection with through Portfolio Manager (similar to “Facebook friends”). Connections are necessary to share your properties with others (either individuals or organizations); you need to be “connected” with them. To make a connection, go to the “Add Contact“ or “Add Organization” page and search for them within Portfolio Manager (they need to have a Portfolio Manager account). Once you find them, send a “Connection” request. After they accept your connection request, they will show up on your list of connected contacts.

Construction Status

Construction Status indicates whether your property is:
  • a design project
  • an existing operational property
  • a test property (one you are using for training or testing new features in Portfolio Manager)
You initially select your construction status when you create a property. You can change the construction status on the Details tab, under Basic Information.

Contacts for Designs /Statement of Design Intent (SEDI)

The application for Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR includes several important contacts:
  • Owner Contact is the person who represents the property owner. EPA will correspond with this person if there are any issues with the application. In most cases, this is the person who submits the application online.
  • Architect of Record is the organization who designed the property.
  • Project Architect is the person who was the main point of contact from the architect firm.
  • Verifying Professional – If you are not using the SEDI for Designed to Earn, then you can use someone other than a Project Architect to sign off on the validity of the information.

Contacts for ENERGY STAR Certification

The application for ENERGY STAR Certification includes several important contacts:
  • Application Primary Contact is the person EPA will correspond with if there are any issues with the application. In most cases, this is the person who submits the application online.
  • Award Recipient is the person to whom your ENERGY STAR congratulations letter and ENERGY STAR decal will be mailed.
  • Signatory is the person in the organization, who will sign the final ENERGY STAR application in hard copy, along with the Licensed Professional. This person must be in your Contacts Book, but does not necessarily have to have a Portfolio Manager account.
  • Property Manager is an outside organization that you have hired to manage your facility operations. If your property is managed internally by the property owner, this field will not be applicable.

Contacts for ENERGY STAR Reports

The various ENERGY STAR Reports include several important contacts:
  • Primary Contact is the main point of contact for the property. This is the person who people would contact with questions about the property.
  • Property Owner is the organization that owns the property/building.
  • Licensed Professional is the person who validates the property information that appears on the report. For ENERGY STAR certification, EPA requires that the Licensed Professional be either a Professional Engineer (PE) or a Registered Architect (RA). For more information, see the glossary term for Licensed Professional.

Convenience Store with Gas Station

Convenience Store with Gas Station refers to buildings that are co-located with gas stations and are used for the sale of a limited range of items such as groceries, toiletries, newspapers, soft drinks, tobacco products, and other everyday items. Convenience Store with Gas Station may include space for vehicle servicing and repair.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, offices, staff break rooms, storage areas, and vehicle repair areas. Energy use associated with outside areas such as vehicle parking and gas filling areas should be included with the total energy use for the building(s), but the square footage associated with these outdoor areas should not be included in the Gross Floor Area.

Convenience Store without Gas Station

Convenience Store without Gas Station refers to buildings used for the sale of a limited range of items such as groceries, toiletries, newspapers, soft drinks, tobacco products, and other everyday items, which are not co-located with a gas station.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, offices, staff break rooms, and storage areas.

Convention Center

Convention center refers to buildings used primarily for large conferences, exhibitions, and similar events. Convention centers may include a diverse variety of spaces, including large exhibition halls, meeting rooms, and concession stands.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including exhibit halls, preparation and staging areas, meeting rooms, concession stands, offices, bathrooms, break rooms, security areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. Loading dock areas located outside the walls of the building should not be included in the gross square footage.

Conference facilities located within a Hotel should be included along with your Hotel property use details, rather than added as a separate Convention Center property use. Conference facilities primarily serving smaller meetings should be entered as Social/Meeting Hall.

Cooking Facilities

Cooking Facilities is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – There is a commercial cooking area designed to provide and serve food to occupants and/or visitors. This may include restaurants and cafeterias.
  • No – There is not a commercial cooking area.
If your facility contains only employee break room kitchens, this field should be marked No.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Cooling Equipment Redundancy

Cooling Equipment Redundancy describes the redundant capacity of the cooling in a Data Center. Redundant components are typically required to accommodate the Data Center in the event of equipment failure. The specific level of redundancy will depend on your particular Data Center.

If there are multiple systems operating at different levels of redundancy, chose the option that applies to the majority of the data center cooling load.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Courthouse

Courthouse refers to buildings used for federal, state, or local courts, and associated administrative office space.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including temporary holding cells, chambers, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, atriums, conference rooms and auditoriums, fitness areas for staff, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Currency Type

Portfolio Manager does not currently assign a Currency Type. You should enter the same Currency Type for all of your properties to allow for comparison. As a future enhancement, Portfolio Manager may add a field to specify a Currency Type of either Canadian Dollars or US Dollars, on a property-by-property basis for all of its all financial indicators (e.g. energy cost, water cost, investment in upgrades, etc). Portfolio Manager does not convert between currencies.

Current as of

“Current as of” is a date that is pre-populated with January 1st of the year that the building was built. You can edit the date if your “property use details” change. For example, if you change your weekly operating hours on June 1st of the same year your building was built, you would change "Current as of" to 6/1/xxxx.

Custom Access

Custom Access allows you to select more granular permissions for each group of information (Property, Meters, Goals, and Recognition). If you are sharing a property with multiple meters, you can even select different permissions for each meter. By default, all selections are set to "Read Only." After you select permissions, you also decide whether you want to give "Share Forward" rights, meaning the ability to share the property with others.

The permissions that you can select are:
  • None suppresses access to that specific tab (Meters or Goals) or that specific information (Certification). However, all metrics for the property are still accessible via Reporting.
  • Read Only provides the ability to view all data, but not edit any data
  • Full Access provides the ability to add and/or edit any of this data. For example, if you want someone to add meter bills to your property, you would select “Full Access” for that meter.
Also see Permissions.

Custom ID

See Property ID.
Back to Top

D

Data Center

Data Center refers to buildings specifically designed and equipped to meet the needs of high density computing equipment, such as server racks, used for data storage and processing. Typically these facilities require dedicated uninterruptible power supplies and cooling systems. Data center functions may include traditional enterprise services, on-demand enterprise services, high performance computing, internet facilities, and/or hosting facilities.

Often Data Centers are free standing, mission critical computing centers. When a data center is located within a larger building, it will usually have its own power and cooling systems, and require a constant power load of 75 kW or more. Data Center is intended for sophisticated computing and server functions; it should not be used to represent a server closet or computer training area.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including raised floor computing space, server rack aisles, storage silos, control console areas, battery rooms, mechanical rooms for cooling equipment, administrative office areas, elevator shafts, stairways, break rooms and restrooms.

Data Center IT Energy

IT Energy is the amount of energy required by the server racks, storage silos, and other IT equipment in the Data Center. IT Energy is a measure of energy (i.e. kWh), it should not be reported as an instantaneous reading of electric demand.

IT Energy may be measured at any of 4 locations:
  • Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Output (required for a score, in most cases)
  • Power Distribution Unit (PDU) Input
  • PDU Output
  • Server/Equipment Input
IT Energy meters permit readings for a user-determined time period (e.g. weekly, monthly, or quarterly). Monthly measurements are recommended, on schedule with utility readings, if possible.

In order to receive an ENERGY STAR score, the IT energy must be measured at the UPS Output. However, you may track IT energy at the other measurement locations for your own purposes. A measurement of IT Energy from the UPS Output is consistent with a Category 1 measurement of data center Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE), as recommended by EPA and other leading organizations. In the following circumstances only, EPA will permit alternate measurement approaches based on the IT configuration:
  • Data Centers that do not have a UPS are permitted to supply readings from the input to the PDU.
  • Data Centers for which more than 10% of the UPS load is directed to non-IT (e.g. mechanical) equipment are required to provide a reading that excludes the non-IT equipment. Two options are permitted:
    • If energy used by non-IT equipment is measured, then you can subtract the non-IT energy from the total UPS energy, and enter the remainder into your UPS Output Meter.
    • If energy used by non-IT equipment is not measured, then you can supply a reading from the input to the PDU that supports the IT equipment.
See our FAQ on the are combinations of Data Center IT Energy Configurations and Meter Types which result in a score.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Data Center IT Energy Configuration

Data Center IT Energy Configuration describes how your IT load is powered and therefore will determine where you must measure IT Energy to earn an ENERGY STAR score for a Data Center. The preferred location of this measurement is at the output of the Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) meter. See the definition of Data Center IT Energy for other meter locations which are permitted under certain conditions when UPS readings are not available. Also see our FAQ on the are combinations of Data Center IT Energy Configurations and Meter Types which result in a score.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Data Center PUE

Data Center Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) is a measure of Data Center infrastructure efficiency, representing the amount of energy that is needed per unit delivered to IT equipment. It is computed as the total annual source energy divided by the annual IT source energy. A typical PUE value is about 2.0, which indicates that for every kWh that is delivered to IT equipment, an additional kWh is required for cooling, power supply, and infrastructure. PUE is the basis of the ENERGY STAR performance scale for Data Centers.

Date Meter became Active - Date Meter became Inactive

The Date Meter became Active and Date Meter became Inactive correspond to the life of a meter.
  • The Date Meter became Active is the date (XX/XX/XXXX) of the very first bill for this meter (when the meter was installed or became active).
  • The Date Meter became Inactive is the date (XX/XX/XXXX) of the very last bill for this meter (when the meter is taken offline or became inactive).

Default Data Flag

Default Data Flag is a Yes/No flag that indicates whether default values have been applied to any of the Property Use Details (such as Hours, Workers, or Computers).
  • Yes - One or more default value was used in the Property Use Details.
  • No – There are no default values for any Property Use Details.
Default values are available for property types that can get a score (in either the US or Canada) and for Property Use Details that are used in the calculation of the score. The default values are derived from the sample population that was used to create each score.

This was designed to help you get a quick score, when you don’t know the exact values for your Property Use Details. However, you should always go back and enter the actual values for your property to obtain the most accurate score. Note, there is never a default for Gross Floor Area (GFA), because GFA is needed to understand your basic property function and populate other default values.

Although the US and Canada rely on different national surveys, the same default values (based on the US population) are applied for all properties, regardless of country. For more information on default values, see our Default Values Technical Reference.

You can view this metric for all properties in a report, or for each individual Property Use Type on the Details tab.

Degree Days

Degree days measure the amount of heating or cooling necessary at your property. Degree days are measured relative to a base of 65oF. Above 65oF it is assumed that your property will need to have cooling and below 65oF it is assumed that your property will need to have heating.
  • Heating Degree Days (HDD) - Literally HDD is the equivalent number of days you would have to heat your building by 1 degree to accommodate the heating requirement. For example, if you have a day on which the temperature is 55oF degrees, that day is worth 10 Heating Degree Days because it is 10 degrees below 65oF. HDD is calculated in this way for each day of the year and summed up to get the total annual HDD.
  • Cooling Degree Days (CDD) - Literally CDD is the equivalent number of days you would have to cool your building by 1 degree to accommodate the cooling requirement. For example, if you have a day on which the temperature is 80oF degrees, that day is worth 15 Cooling Degree Days because it is 15 degrees above 65oF. CDD is calculated in this way for each day of the year and summed up to get the total annual CDD.

Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR

Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR (DEES) recognition is awarded for design projects that meet property type requirements, achieves a 75 or higher ENERGY STAR 1-100 score and account for total annual estimated energy use.

Design Site Energy

See Site Energy.

Design Source Energy

See Source Energy.

Design Target

See Target Values.

Dining Hall

Dining Hall is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – There is a Dining Hall, which refers to special space and equipment in a residential facility that is dedicated to food preparation and service for the residents. This may include bakeries, lunch counters, restaurants, or other commercial food service activities. This does not include student or occupant lounges or galleys that have food-preparation equipment and/or vending machines.
  • No – The property does not contain a Dining Hall.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Direct GHG Emissions

See GHG Emissions.

Distribution Center

Distribution Center refers to unrefrigerated buildings that are used for the temporary storage and redistribution of goods, manufactured products, merchandise or raw materials.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including space designed to store non-perishable goods and merchandise, offices, lobbies, stairways, rest rooms, equipment storage areas, and elevator shafts. This should not include exterior/outdoor loading bays or docks.

Drinking Water Treatment & Distribution

Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution refers to facilities designed to pump and distribute drinking water through a network of pipes. Depending on the water source (ground water, surface water, purchased water), a water utility may or may not contain a treatment process. This property use applies to any/all water sources and any/all levels of treatment.

Gross Floor Area should include all areas within the physical structures at the plant including treatment areas, administrative offices, stairways, hallways and mechanical rooms. The Gross Floor Area should not include any exterior portions of the facility, such as retention or settling ponds.

Although not typically used for normalization at plants, Gross Floor Area is a required system input for all properties.
Back to Top

E

Editing and Updating

In the action menu for each property, you will find two ways to change your data:
  • Correct Mistakes – If you find a mistake or want to finalize an estimated number, this selection takes you to the History Log. Making an edit in the History Log will correct the value, but there will not be a record of this change saved in Portfolio Manager.
  • Update With New Information – If a change has occurred on your property (for example, your weekly operating hours changed from 40 hours per week to 60 hours per week) you will want to use the Update Use Details page, where you can enter the effective date for this change. Your energy use intensity can be affected by these changes. Portfolio Manager saves a record of all “updates” in the History Log.

Electric Distribution Utility (EDU)

See Electric Emissions Rate.

Electric Emissions Rate

The Electric Emissions Rate conveys the amount of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions associated with your electricity consumption, in kilograms per MBtu. Note that the electric emissions rate depends on where your property is located, EPA uses the average electricity production output emission rate of the electricity grid serving the property, as defined by the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID). Electric Emissions Rate are based on one of the following:
  • Regional Power Grid – This is the geographic area across which the electric power grid is fully interconnected. In the US, this is defined by the eGRID subregion, one of 26 regions defined by NERC. In Canada, the Regional Power Grid is based on your province.
  • Electric Distribution Utility (EDU) – This is an additional level of regional specificity available for buildings in the US only. The EDU is the company responsible for maintaining the utility lines and the electric distribution to the property. Note that the EDU is not the just “the utility company.” In some states the energy markets are deregulated. This means that a property may contract with Company A to provide the power supply (energy from the power plant), while Company B will continue to provide the electric distribution (Company B is the EDU). To determine the Electric Emissions rate in Portfolio Manager, it is important to know the physical location of your building on the grid.
  • Power Generation Plant (Optional, and applicable in US only) –users have the option to specify an individual power plant to which the property is directly connected. Please note that this is highly atypical. It is only relevant if there is an explicit power purchasing agreement between the property and the power plant. This is rare for commercial properties, but can occur for a property with high energy use situated near to a plant (e.g. a data center or a light manufacturing facility).
For full documentation on how emissions rates are determined, view our Calculation Methodology Document.

Enclosed Floor Area

Enclosed Floor Area is the area within a Stadium or Arena that is covered/fully enclosed and can be conditioned. This is a subset of the Gross Floor Area that reflects only areas that are fully enclosed, which may include offices, storage areas, restaurants, and maintenance rooms.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Enclosed Mall

Enclosed Mall refers to buildings that house multiple stores, often “anchored” by one or more department stores, and with interior walkways. Most stores will not have entrances accessible from outside, with the exception of the “anchor” stores.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including retail stores, offices, food courts, restaurants, storage areas, staff break rooms, atriums, walkways, stairwells, and mechanical rooms.

Energy/Power Station

Energy/Power Station applies to buildings containing machinery and/or associated equipment for generating electricity or district heat (steam, hot water, or chilled water) from a raw fuel, including fossil fuel power plants, traditional district heat power plants, combined heat and power plants, nuclear reactors, hydroelectric dams, or facilities associated with a solar or wind farm.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including power generation areas (boilers, turbines etc), administrative space, cooling towers, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, meeting rooms, cafeterias, stairways, elevator shafts, and storage areas (which may include fossil fuel storage tanks or bins). This should not include any exterior spaces associated with the power stations.

Energy Cost

The energy cost is the annual cost associated with the selected 12 month time period for a property or building. Energy cost is available for each individual energy type and also as an aggregated value across all energy types.

Energy Rate

The Energy Rate is the price of energy per unit. For example, the electricity rate might be 11 cents per kilo-watt hour. Natural gas rate might be $13 per million Btu.

Energy Service Providers

Energy Service Providers are companies that offer energy services and products to help you improve the energy efficiency of your property.

ENERGY STAR Certification

ENERGY STAR Certification is awarded to buildings and manufacturing plants that earn a 75 or higher on EPA's 1-100 energy performance scale, indicating that the facility performs better than at least 75% of similar buildings nationwide. The ENERGY STAR energy performance scale accounts for differences in operating conditions, regional weather data, and other important considerations.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Application Status

ENERGY STAR Certification - Application Status is the current status of any application for ENERGY STAR certification. These are the different statuses
  • Submitted - This property has submitted an application, but EPA has not begun review.
  • Under Review - There is an application under review by EPA.
  • Escalated to Expert - There is an application under review by EPA and the review has been escalated to a subject matter expert.
  • Questions for Applicant - EPA has asked you questions about your application.
  • Revised Application Required - EPA has required a revised application.
  • Pending Approval - Your application has no outstanding technical questions, however your approval will not go through until January 1 because you have already earned certification in the current year. Please note that the date of your certification is based on the date on which your application is approved. Therefore, if an application is approved on January 5, 2012, a second application cannot be approved until January 1, 2013.
  • Approved - Your application has been approved, but your award has not yet been shipped to your property.
  • Award Sent - Your award has been sent.
  • Expired - Your application has expired because you did not respond to questions from EPA.
  • Not Approved - Your application was not approved by EPA.
  • Not Applicable – This property has not earned ENERGY STAR certification in the past and does not have any applications currently submitted or under review.
Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Eligibility

ENERGY STAR Certification - Eligibility indicates whether or not your property is eligible for ENERGY STAR certification. If your property is not eligible, this column will list a reason. Common reasons for not being eligible include:
  • Your property is not able to earn a 1-100 score
  • You do not have an ENERGY STAR score of 75 or higher
  • You have already earned ENERGY STAR certification within the last 12 months
  • Your energy data is more than 120 days old
Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Last Approval Date

ENERGY STAR Certification - Last Approval Date is the date that EPA approved your last application. If your property has not earned certification, no value will display here.

Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Next Eligible Date

ENERGY STAR Certification – Date Next Eligible is the date on which you are next eligible to apply for ENERGY STAR Certification. It is 1 year after the ending date of your last approved application (“For Year Ending: XXX”). For example, if your last certification was for the calendar year of 2012, your Date Next Eligible is December 31, 2013. If your property has not earned certification, no value will display here.

Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Profile Published

Profile Published is a yes/no designation indicating whether a profile for the ENERGY STAR Registry of Certified Buildings has been published for your property. Please note that if your property has not earned certification, no value will display here.
Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Certification - Year(s) Certified

ENERGY STAR Certification - Year(s) Certified is a list of all years for which your property has been certified.

Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

ENERGY STAR Data Verification Checklist

The Data Verification Checklist is a version of the application for ENERGY STAR certification, for non-application purposes. It consists of the same sections as the application, including an overview of the overall property, the property use details, and energy consumption. A Verifying Professional can sign and stamp it to verify the validity of the data, if needed.

ENERGY STAR Partner

An ENERGY STAR Partner is a business or organization who signs a partnership agreement with EPA's ENERGY STAR program and makes a fundamental commitment to protect the environment through the continuous improvement of energy performance.

ENERGY STAR Score

The ENERGY STAR Score is a measure of how well your property is performing relative to similar properties, when normalized for climate and operational characteristics.

The ENERGY STAR scores are based on data from national building energy consumption surveys, and this allows Portfolio Manager to control for key variables affecting a building’s energy performance, including climate, hours of operation, and building size. What this means is that buildings from around the country, with different operating parameters and subject to different weather patterns, can be compared side-by-side in order to see how they stack up in terms of energy performance. The specific factors that are included in this normalization (Hours, Workers, Climate, etc) will depend on the property type.

The 1-100 scale is set so that 1 represents the worst performing buildings and 100 represents the best performing buildings. A score of 50 indicates that a building is performing at the national median, taking into account its size, location, and operating parameters. A score of 75 indicates that at a property is performing in the 75th percentile and may be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR Certification.

ENERGY STAR Scores are available for many property types.

The 1-100 scale is based on the country in which your property is located. Properties in the US are compared to the national population of properties in the US. Similarly, properties in Canada are compared to the national population of properties in Canada. At this time there are no ENERGY STAR scores specifically developed for other countries. Therefore, properties located in other countries will be compared to the US national population, by default.

Energy Use by Type

Energy Use by Type is a summary of the annual consumption of an individual type of energy (e.g. electricity or natural gas). Annual totals are available for every energy type in Portfolio Manager:
  • electricity (grid, onsite solar, onsite wind)
  • natural gas
  • district steam
  • district hot water
  • district chilled water (electric driven chiller, absorption chiller using natural gas, engine-drive chiller using natural gas, other)
  • propane and liquid propane
  • fuel oil (no. 1)
  • fuel oil (no. 2)
  • fuel oil (no. 4)
  • fuel oil (no. 5 and no. 6)
  • diesel (no. 2)
  • kerosene
  • wood
  • coal (bituminous and anthracite)
  • coke
  • other

Energy Use Units

You can choose from two different setting for the Units you see throughout Portfolio Manager:
  • Metric Units – This will apply standard metric units to all values. Standard metric units include square meters for area, joules for energy, kilograms and Metric Tons for emissions, and cubic meters for volumes. For example:
    • EUI will be in gigajoules per square meter (GJ/m2)
    • Area will be in square meters (m2)
    • Volume of water will be in cubic meters (m3)
    • Emissions will be in Kilograms (kg) or Metric Tons (t)
  • EPA Units – The standard units applied by EPA for the most part follow the International System of Units (SI). However, for a few key performance metrics related to emissions, EPA recommends metric units for consistency with common business practices and global protocol. EPA units include square feet for area, British Thermal Units (Btu) for energy, kilograms and Metric Tons for emissions, and gallons for volumes. For example:
    • EUI will be in kBtu/ft2
    • Area will be in ft2
    • Volume of water will be in kgal
    • Emissions will be in Kilograms or Metric Tons

Please bear in mind that you can modify your account settings at any time to change you unit preference.

Enrollment

Enrollment is the total student enrollment for the year (i.e. number of students).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Estimated Data Flag

Estimated Data Flag is a Yes/No flag that indicates whether there are any estimated meter entries (for energy or water meters).
  • Yes - A meter(s) includes estimated usage.
  • No - There are no estimated meter entries.
You can view this metric for all properties in a report, or for each individual energy or water meter type (Electricity, Natural Gas, Municipally Supplied Potable Water – Outdoor Use, etc).

Estimated Savings from Energy Projects

Estimated Savings from Energy Projects is anticipated savings that you estimate for your energy projects. This is a value you will calculate through either engineered assumptions or energy modeling. This value is entered at the start of an project so that you can track actual performance before and after the upgrade. When computed at the property level, this metric will sum the Estimated Savings from Energy Project across all individual projects that you have entered for the property.

Estimated Total Annual Energy Use

A property design does not have any actual energy data, therefore, you need to estimate the property's energy use for metric calculations.

Exchange Data

Exchange Data allows you to select an organization (which is registered to use web services) to exchange data with your Portfolio Manager account. You will be able to specify specific permissions regarding whether the organization will be able to view or modify property, building, and meter level information. You will also decide if you want to grant "Share Forward” rights, meaning the ability to share the property with others.
  • Note: When sharing to exchange data, you may also be required to provide additional information to the organization so that they can process your request to exchange data with Portfolio Manager.
Also see Permissions.

Exchanging Data

Portfolio Manager has been designed to allow third-party organizations to electronically sync data with your account. You can authorize companies that exchange data with Portfolio Manager to update your meters, manage building data, and retrieve metrics. To get started, search for organizations that exchange data. Then connect with them and share your properties and meters. More information about exchanging data via web services.

Exterior Entrance to the Public

Exterior Entrance to the Public is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The store has an exterior entrance through which customers enter from the outside.
  • No – There is no exterior entrance available to the public. Patrons must enter through an interior entrance, such as from within a mall or an atrium in a mixed use establishment.
Note that a retail store must have an Exterior Entrance to the Public in order to be eligible to receive the ENERGY STAR.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

F

Fast Food Restaurant

Fast Food Restaurant, also known as Quick Service Restaurant, refers to buildings used for the preparation and sale of ready-to-eat food. Fast Food Restaurants are characterized by a limited menu of food prepared quickly (often within a few minutes), and sometimes cooked in bulk in advance and kept hot.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including kitchens, sales areas, dining areas, offices, staff break rooms, and storage areas. Gross Floor Area should not include any outdoor/exterior seating areas, but the energy use of these outdoor areas should be reported on your energy meters.

Federal Agency/Department

The government agency or department that owns or leases the federal property. This is relevant for US and Canada.

Federal Region/Sub-Department

The regional or sub-departmental information associated with property that is owned or leased by the government. This is relevant for the U.S. and Canada.

Financial Office

Financial Office refers to buildings used for financial services such as bank headquarters and securities and brokerage firms.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, trading floors, conference rooms and auditoriums, vaults, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, atriums, fitness areas for staff, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Fire Station

Fire Station refers to buildings used to provide emergency response services associated with fires. Fire stations may be staffed by either volunteer or full-time paid firemen.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including office areas, vehicle storage areas, residential areas (if applicable), storage areas, break rooms, kitchens, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Fitness Center/Health Club/Gym

Fitness Center/Health Club/Gym refers to buildings used for recreational or professional athletic training and related activities.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including weight and cardio equipment areas, personal training areas, courts, locker rooms, sauna and spa areas, retail areas, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Fixed Film Trickle Filtration Process

Fixed Film Trickle Filtration Process is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The plant uses Trickle Filtration as a method of biological treatment. Trickle Filtration is a process used to reduce Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and ammonia nitrogen levels. Trickling filters are composed of a bed of porous material (rocks, slag, plastic media, or any other medium with a high surface area and high permeability). Wastewater is distributed over the surface of the media, where it flows downward as a thin film over the media surface for aerobic treatment. The wastewater is then collected at the bottom through an under-drain system. The effluent is then settled by gravity to remove biological solids prior to being discharged.
  • No – The plant does not utilize Trickle Filtration.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Food Sales

Food Sales refers to buildings used for the sales of food on either a retail or wholesale basis, but which do not meet the definition of Supermarket/Grocery Store, Convenience Store, or Convenience Store with Gas Stations. For example, specialty food sales like a cheese shop or butcher.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales areas, storage areas, offices, kitchens, and staff break rooms.

Food Service

Food Service refers to buildings used for preparation and sale of food and beverages, but which do not meet the definition of Restaurant, Cafeteria, or Bar/Nightclub. For example a bakery or coffee shop.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including kitchens, sales areas, dining areas, staff break rooms, and storage areas. Gross Floor Area should not include any outdoor/exterior seating areas, but the energy use of these outdoor areas should be reported on your energy meters.

Full Access

Full Access is the ability to view and edit your property. With Full Access, a person can do all of the same things you can, except delete the property. Full Access automatically comes with the ability to "Share Forward,” which means the person with whom you share can also share that property with others. If you want someone to have Full Access to all the property data, but NOT be able to “Share Forward,” then you need to share with Custom Access.

Also see Permissions.

Full Service Spa Floor Area

The Full Service Spa Floor Area is the total area that is devoted to full-service spa operations. A full-service spa will usually have a dedicated staff of trained specialists; do not enter “spa” simply because there is a hot tub/whirlpool or sauna.

The area should include all portions of the spa such as all reception areas, dressing/changing rooms, dry treatment rooms (e.g., massages), water treatment rooms (e.g., hydrotherapy), pump/mechanical rooms, and storage areas. Do not include area related to a gym or fitness center, which is captured separately as Gym/Fitness Center Floor Area.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Full Year of Energy

Full Year of Energy is a Yes/No flag that indicates whether there is a full year of energy data available for the selected time period:
  • Yes - There is a full year (12 complete calendar months) of energy data associated with the selected time period.
  • No - There less than a full year (fewer than 12 calendar months) of energy data associated with the selected time period.

Full Year of Water

Full Year of Water is a Yes/No flag that indicates whether there is a full year of water data available for the selected time period:
  • Yes - There is a full year (12 complete calendar months) of water data associated with the selected time period.
  • No - There less than a full year (fewer than 12 calendar months) of water data associated with the selected time period.
Back to Top

G

GHG Emissions

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions are the carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) gases released into the atmosphere as a result of energy consumption at the property. GHG emissions are expressed in carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e), a universal unit of measure that combines the quantity and global warming potential of each greenhouse gas. Emissions are reported in four categories, each is available as a total amount in metric tons (Metric Tons CO2e) or as an intensity value in kilograms per square foot (kgCO2e/ft2):

  • Direct Emissions – Direct Emissions are emissions associated with onsite fuel combustion (e.g. combustion of natural gas or fuel oil).
  • Indirect Emissions – Indirect Emissions are emissions associated with purchases of electricity, district steam, district hot water, or district chilled water. These emissions occur at your utility’s plant, but they are a result of your property’s energy consumption and therefore contribute to your overall GHG footprint.
  • Biomass Emissions– Biomass Emissions are emissions associated with biogenic fuels such as wood or biogas (captured methane). The only biomass fuel currently available in Portfolio Manager is wood. Biogenic fuels are combusted onsite, but do not contribute to direct emissions.
  • Total Emissions – Total Emissions is the sum of Direct Emissions and Indirect Emissions.

Government Subsidized Housing

Government Subsidized Housing is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property receives some type of local, state, or federal affordable housing subsidy for some or all units. Examples include Federal Housing Association (FHA) Insured; Public Housing; Agricultural Housing; Veterans Affairs (VA) Housing; Department of Defense (DoD) Housing; Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC); Project Based Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) (including Section 8), or another type of local, state or federal subsidy.
  • No – The property does not receive any subsidies.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Grant Dollars

Grant Dollars is the annual amount of grant dollars received by the college/university.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Green Button

Green Button is an industry-led effort that began in January 2012 in response to a White House directive to provide utility customers electronic access to their energy data in a standard format. The purpose is to empower customers with data. When Green Button is fully implemented, the goal is that consumers will be able to take advantage of a growing array of online services to help them manage their energy data and save money.

The Green Button "standard" XML file format is planned to be used in two ways:

  1. Download My Data / Upload My Data. Consumers can "Download My Data" (from participating utilities or Portfolio Manager) in the Green Button format. Then, with the Green Button file in hand, "Upload My Data" to another website (e.g. a participating energy service company).
  2. Connect My Data. This is a data exchange protocol (like Portfolio Manager's Data Exchange) which allows for the automatic transfer of energy bill data from a utility to a third party based on customer authorization.
As a first step, Portfolio Manager has implemented Download My Data for electric meters. This means you can download your Portfolio Manager electric meter data in the Green Button XML file format (See: "How do I download my Portfolio Manager data in Green Button format?"). A use for this file might be a 3rd party vendor who offers energy consulting services and can upload your file to offer you efficiency recommendations.

As a future enhancement, we are considering adding Upload My Data to Portfolio Manager (where you would download the Green Button file from your utility, and upload it into Portfolio Manager. EPA is also tracking Connect My Data. However, the standard and certification process for Connect My Data are still under development by the Green Button consortium.
Learn more at http://www.greenbuttondata.org

Green Power

Green Power is a generic term for renewable energy sources and specific clean energy technologies that emit fewer GHG emissions relative to other sources of energy that supply the electric grid. Green power sources in Portfolio Manager include solar photovoltaic panels, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, landfill gas, low-impact hydropower, and wind turbines. You may use green power directly from an on-site renewable system, or you may purchase green power from your utility or independent green power supplier. In order for power to be considered green, you must own what are called the Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), or the legal claims/rights to the environmental benefits of the green power. These rights can be sold separately from the actual electricity (kWh). Therefore, please note the following distinction between Onsite and Offsite Green Power:
  • Onsite Green Power – Power generated from an onsite renewable system. The only types of onsite green power currently tracked in Portfolio Manager are solar and wind power. Energy use from these systems is green only if you retain the rights to the RECs associated with the power generated by your system. If you sell the RECs (for example, through REC arbitrage), then you do not have onsite green power.
  • Offsite Green Power – Green power purchases from your utility and/or independent purchases of RECs. If through utility purchases you acquire both electricity (kWh) and RECs, then you have the right to the Green Power. If you purchase your electricity (kWh) from your utility but your RECs from another provider, then your utility power is also considered green.

Gross Floor Area

The Gross Floor Area (GFA) is the total property square footage, measured between the principal exterior surfaces of the enclosing fixed walls of the building(s). This includes all areas inside the building(s) including supporting areas. GFA is not the same as rentable space, but rather includes all area inside the building(s).

Include in GFA: lobbies, tenant areas, common areas, meeting rooms, break rooms, atriums (count the base level only), restrooms, elevator shafts, stairwells, mechanical equipment areas, basements, storage rooms.

Do not include in GFA: exterior spaces, balconies, patios, exterior loading docks, driveways, covered walkways, outdoor playcourts (tennis, basketball, etc.), parking (How to enter parking?), the interstitial plenum space between floors (which house pipes and ventilation), crawl spaces.

  • Although you do not include these areas in your GFA, you do include their energy use. Our algorithms assume buildings have outdoor usage, too. The GFA refers specifically to interior space. But the energy use evaluated in our algorithms should be all energy required to operate your building, which includes the energy used both inside and out.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

For Wastewater Treatment Plant and Municipal Water Treatment and Distribution Plant GFA should reflect interior spaces only and should not include exterior portions of the facility such as retention or settling ponds.

Group

You can create Groups for your properties to help you access them quicker. For example you could create a Group for each Region of the country, or a Group for each account manager. Once you create Groups you can use them to more easily select properties (such as in Reporting). You can create and edit Groups from the My Portfolio page.

Guiding Principle 1.1 Integrated - Team

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was originally developed for US Federal buildings managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use an integrated team to develop and implement policy regarding sustainable operations and maintenance.

Guiding Principle 1.2 Integrated - Goals

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was originally developed for US Federal buildings managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Establish operational performance goals for energy, water, material use and recycling, and indoor environmental quality, and ensure incorporation of these goals throughout the remaining lifecycle of the building. Incorporate sustainable operations and maintenance practices within the appropriate Environmental Management System (EMS).

Guiding Principle 1.3 Integrated - Plan

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Incorporate a building management plan to ensure that operating decisions and tenant education are carried out with regard to integrated, sustainable building operations and maintenance.

Guiding Principle 1.4 Integrated -Occupant Feedback

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Augment building operations and maintenance as needed using occupant feedback on work space satisfaction.

Guiding Principle 1.5 Integrated - Commissioning

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Assess existing condition and operational procedures of the building and major building systems and identify areas for improvement. Employ recommissioning, tailored to the size and complexity of the building and its system components, in order to optimize and verify performance of fundamental building systems. Commissioning must be performed by an experienced commissioning provider. When building commissioning has been performed, the commissioning report, summary of actions taken, and schedule for recommissioning must be documented. Building recommissioning must have been performed within four years prior to reporting a building as meeting the Guiding Principles. Meet the requirements of EISA 2007, Section 432.

Guiding Principle 2.1 Energy Efficiency - Option 1

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Receive an ENERGY STAR® score of 75 or higher.

Guiding Principle 2.1 Energy Efficiency - Option 2

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Reduce measured building energy use by 20% compared to building energy use in 2003 or a year thereafter with quality energy use data.

Guiding Principle 2.1 Energy Efficiency - Option 3

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings. Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Reduce energy use by 20% compared to the ASHRAE 90.1 2007 baseline building design if design information is available.

Guiding Principle 2.1 Energy - Energy Efficiency (Any Option)

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Assess energy efficiency using one of the three efficiency options (ENERGY STAR Score, Measured 20% reduction, or 20% reduction compared to code).

Guiding Principle 2.2 Energy - Efficient Products

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use ENERGY STAR and FEMP-designated energy efficient products, where available.

Guiding Principle 2.3 Energy - Onsite Renewable

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Implement renewable energy generation projects on agency property for agency use, when lifecycle cost effective.

Guiding Principle 2.4 Energy - Measurement and Verification

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Per the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct2005) Section 103, install building level electricity meters to track and continuously optimize performance. Per the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) 2007, the utility meters must also include natural gas and steam, where natural gas and steam are used.

Guiding Principle 2.5 Energy - Benchmarking

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Compare annual performance data with previous years' performance data, preferably by entering annual performance data into the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and/or Labs 21 for laboratories.

Guiding Principle 3.1 Indoor Water - Option 1

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Reduce potable water use by 20% compared to a water baseline calculated for the building. The water baseline, for buildings with plumbing fixtures installed in 1994 or later, is 120% of the Uniform Plumbing Codes (UPC) 2006 or the International Plumbing Codes (IPC) 2006 fixture performance requirements. The water baseline for plumbing fixtures older than 1994 is 160% of the UPC 2006 or the IPC 2006 fixture performance requirements.

Guiding Principle 3.1 Indoor Water - Option 2

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Reduce building measured potable water use by 20% compared to building water use in 2003 or a year thereafter with quality water data. If only one meter is installed for the site, reduce the water use (indoor and outdoor combined) by at least 20% compared to building water use in 2003 or a year thereafter.

Guiding Principle 3.1 Water - Indoor Water (Any Option)

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Assess indoor water using one of the two options (measured 20% reduction or 20% reduction compared to code)

Guiding Principle 3.2 Outdoor Water - Option 1

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Reduce potable irrigation water use by 50% compared to conventional methods.

Guiding Principle 3.2 Outdoor Water - Option 2

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Reduce building related potable irrigation water use by 50% compared to measured irrigation water use in 2003 or a year thereafter with quality water data. If only one meter is installed for the site, reduce the potable water use (indoor and outdoor combined) by at least 20% compared to building water use in 2003 or a year thereafter.

Guiding Principle 3.2 Outdoor Water - Option 3

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use no potable irrigation water.

Guiding Principle 3.2 Water - Outdoor Water (Any Option)

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Assess outdoor water using one of three options (50% measured improvement, 50% reduction compared to code, or no outdoor water consumption.

Guiding Principle 3.3 Water - Stormwater

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Employ strategies that reduce storm water runoff and discharges of polluted water offsite. Per EISA Section 438, where redevelopment affects site hydrology, use site planning, design, construction, and maintenance strategies to maintain hydrologic conditions during development, or to restore hydrologic conditions following development, to the maximum extent that is technically feasible.

Guiding Principle 3.4 Water - Efficient Products

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Where available, use EPA's WaterSense labeled products or other water conserving products. Choose irrigation contractors who are certified through a WaterSense-labeled program.

Guiding Principle 4.1 Indoor Environment - Ventilation and Thermal Comfort

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the 2008 Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Meet ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy and ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.

Guiding Principle 4.2 Indoor Environment - Moisture Control

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Provide policy and illustrate the use of an appropriate moisture control strategy to prevent building damage, minimize mold contamination, and reduce health risks related to moisture. For facade renovations, Dew Point analysis and a plan for cleanup or infiltration of moisture into building materials are required.

Guiding Principle 4.3 Indoor Environment - Automated Lighting Controls

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Provide automated lighting controls (occupancy/vacancy sensors with manual-off capability) for appropriate spaces including restrooms, conference and meeting rooms, employee lunch and break rooms, training classrooms, and offices.

Guiding Principle 4.4 Daylighting and Occupant Controls - Option 1

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Provide automated lighting controls (occupancy/vacancy sensors with manual-off capability) for appropriate spaces including restrooms, conference and meeting rooms, employee lunch and break rooms, training classrooms, and offices.

Guiding Principle 4.4 Daylighting and Occupant Controls - Option 2

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Provide occupant controlled lighting, allowing adjustments to suit individual task needs, for 50% of regularly occupied spaces.

Guiding Principle 4.4 Indoor Environment - Daylighting and Occupant Controls (Any Option)

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Choose one of two options to meet additional daylighting and lighting controls performance expectations (minimum daylight factor or occupant controlled lighting)

Guiding Principle 4.5 Indoor Environment - Low-Emitting Materials

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use low emitting materials for building modifications, maintenance, and cleaning. In particular, specify the following materials and products to have low pollutant emissions: composite wood products, adhesives, sealants, interior paints and finishes, solvents, carpet systems, janitorial supplies, and furnishings.

Guiding Principle 4.6 Indoor Environment - Integrated Pest Management

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use integrated pest management techniques as appropriate to minimize pesticide usage. Use EPA-registered pesticides only when needed.

Guiding Principle 4.7 Indoor Environment - Tobacco Smoke Control

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Prohibit smoking within the building and within 25 feet of all building entrances, operable windows, and building ventilation intakes.

Guiding Principle 5.1 Materials - Recycled Content

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Per section 6002 of RCRA, for EPA-designated products, meet or exceed EPA's recycled content recommendations for building modifications, maintenance, and cleaning. For other products, use materials with recycled content such that the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes at least 10% (based on cost or weight) of the total value of the materials in the project. If EPA-designated products meet performance requirements and are available at a reasonable cost, a preference for purchasing them shall be included in all solicitation relevant to construction, operation, maintenance of or use in the building. EPA's recycled content products designations and recycled content recommendations are available on EPA's Comprehensive Procurement Guideline web site at www.epa.gov/cpg.

Guiding Principle 5.2 Materials - Biobased Content

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:

Per section 9002 of FSRIA, for USDA-designated products, use products with the highest content level per USDA's biobased content recommendations. For other products, use biobased products made from rapidly renewable resources and certified sustainable wood products. If these designated products meet performance requirements and are available at a reasonable cost, a preference for purchasing them should be included in all solicitations relevant to construction, operation, maintenance of or use in building. USDA's biobased product designations and biobased content recommendations are available on USDA's BioPreferred web site at www.biopreferred.gov.

Guiding Principle 5.3 Materials - Environmentally Preferred Products

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Use products that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment over their lifecycle when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. A number of standards and ecolabels are available in the marketplace to assist specifiers in making environmentally preferable decisions. For recommendations, consult the US Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers at www.wbdg.org/design/greenspec.php

Guiding Principle 5.4 Materials - Waste and Materials Mgmt

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Provide reuse and recycling services for building occupants, where markets or on-site recycling exist. Provide salvage, reuse and recycling services for waste generated from building operations, maintenance, repair and minor renovations, and discarded furnishings, equipment and property. This could include such things as beverage containers and paper from building occupants, batteries, toner cartridges, outdated computers from an equipment update, and construction materials from a minor renovation.

Guiding Principle 5.5 Materials - Ozone Depleting Compounds

The Sustainable Buildings Checklist evaluates sustainability in existing buildings. It was first developed for US federal building managers for compliance with the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Buildings. It is also a valuable tool for evaluating the sustainability of non-government buildings.

Specifically, the intent of this Guiding Principle is to:
Eliminate the use of ozone depleting compounds where alternative environmentally preferable products are available, consistent with either the Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, or equivalent overall air quality benefits that take into account lifecycle impacts.

Guiding Principles -Actual Date of Compliance

The date a property achieves 100% Sustainable Buildings Checklist completion. Portfolio Manager does not automatically populate this date. It is entered by the user.

Guiding Principles - Checklist Manager

The Checklist Manager is the person who is responsible for the completion of the Sustainable Buildings Checklist for the property. This person may be any one of your contacts.

Guiding Principles - Completion

Sustainable Buildings Checklist Completion is the percentage of Guiding Principles required actions that are considered complete. A required action is complete if "Yes" or "Not Applicable" is selected. The user must justify a “Not Applicable” selection for these required actions to count towards Sustainable Buildings Checklist completion.

Guiding Principles - Target Date of Compliance

The date a property is expected to achieve 100% Sustainable Buildings Checklist Completion. Portfolio Manager does not automatically populate this date. It is entered by the user.

Gym/Fitness Center Floor Area

The Gym/Fitness Center Floor Area is the total area that is devoted to gym or fitness center operations, including all reception areas, locker rooms, weight rooms, cardiovascular equipment rooms, special-purpose rooms (e.g., classroom/studio space for aerobics; spinning; sauna) and storage/mechanical rooms. A Gym/Fitness Center may be staffed or unstaffed, and may range from a single room with a treadmill and a multipurpose machine to a full fitness club with a wide variety of machines and program offerings.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Gymnasium Floor Area

Gymnasium Floor Area is the total size of all areas devoted to a gymnasium. This will be a subset of the Gross Floor Area for the property, and should include gymnasium/athletic areas, spectator areas, locker rooms, and other associated space.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

H

High School

High School is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The school teaches to high school students (grades 10, 11, and/or 12). For example, if your school teaches to grades K-12 (elementary/middle and high school), select Yes.
  • No – The school does not teach to high school students. For example, if your school is only teaches to grades 5 and 6, select No.
If your property is still in the design phase, this value should reflect the best estimate of conditions that will be in effect when the property is fully operational.

History Log

The History Log is a record of all “updates” you have made to your Property Use Details (ex. Number of Workers, Weekly Operating Hours). See “Editing and Updating” for more information.

Hospital (General Medical & Surgical)

Hospital refers to a general medical and surgical hospital (including critical access hospitals and children’s hospitals). These facilities provide acute care services intended to treat patients for short periods of time, including emergency medical care, physician's office services, diagnostic care, ambulatory care, surgical care, and limited specialty services such as rehabilitation and cancer care.

The definition of Hospital accounts for all space types owned by the hospital that are located within the Hospital building/campus, including non-clinical spaces such as administrative offices, food service, retail, hotels, and power plant.

Gross Floor Area (GFA) should include all space within the building(s) on the campus including operating rooms, bedrooms, emergency treatment areas, medical offices, exam rooms, laboratories, lobbies, atriums, cafeterias, rest rooms, stairways, corridors connecting buildings, storage areas, and elevator shafts.

To be eligible for the Hospital Property Type:
  • More than 50% of the GFA of all buildings must be used for general medical and surgical services and
  • more than 50% of the licensed beds must provide acute care services.
Properties that use more than 50% of the GFA for long-term acute care, specialty care, and/or ambulatory surgical centers, or that have less than 50% of their beds licensed for acute care services are not eligible for an ENERGY STAR score.

If your facility does not meet this definition, it is not eligible for an ENERGY STAR score as a Hospital. However, your property may be eligible under another healthcare property type:

Hospital Laboratory

A Laboratory is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property contains a laboratory, which is typically an area used for experimentation/testing that has independently controlled and specifically designed environmental systems.
  • No – The property does not contain a laboratory.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Hotel

Hotel refers to buildings renting overnight accommodations on a room/suite and nightly basis, and typically include a bath/shower and other facilities in guest rooms. Hotel properties typically have daily services available to guests including housekeeping/laundry and a front desk/concierge.

Hotel does not apply to properties where more than 50% of the floor area is occupied by fractional ownership units such as condominiums or vacation timeshares, or to private residences that are rented out on a daily or weekly basis. Hotel properties should be majority-owned by a single entity and have rooms available on a nightly basis. Condominiums or Time Shares should select the Multifamily Housing property use.

Gross Floor Area should include all interior space within the building(s), including guestrooms, halls, lobbies, atriums food preparation and restaurant space, conference and banquet space, fitness centers/spas, indoor pool areas, laundry facilities, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, storage areas, employee break rooms, and back-of-house offices.

Hours Per Day Guests Onsite

The Hours Per Day Guests Onsite is the average number of hours per day that a typical guest will spend on the hotel premises including time spent in guest rooms, at hotel restaurants, at meetings/conference activities, and/or engaging in recreational activities located on the hotel grounds. You can select from the following options: .
  • Less than 15 Hours
  • 15-19 Hours
  • 20 Hours or more
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

I

Ice/Curling Rink

Ice/Curling Rink refers to buildings that include one or more ice sheets used for public or private, recreational or professional skating, curling, hockey, or other similar activities.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including ice area, spectator areas, concession stands, retail areas, locker rooms, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.

Larger facilities primarily serving professional or collegiate functions and with significant spectator seating should review the definition for Indoor Arena to determine the best classification.

Ice Events

Ice Events is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property hosts ice events such as organized hockey games, ice skating competitions, and/or on-ice shows.
  • No – The property does not host any ice events.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Indirect Emissions

Indoor Arena

Indoor Arena refers to enclosed structures used for professional or collegiate sports and entertainment events. Examples of events held in indoor arenas include basketball and hockey games, circus performances, and concerts. Indoor Arenas usually have capacities of 5,000 seats or more and are often characterized by multiple concourses and concession areas.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building, including court/rink space, all concourse space on which workers or guests can walk, concession areas, retail stores, restaurants, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, kitchens, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Investment in Energy Projects

Investment in Energy Projects is the total cost/investment for an energy upgrade at your property. This value is entered along with an upgrade so that you can track your cumulative investment and compare this with your energy savings. At the property level, this investment value is summed across all individual energy projects that have been entered.
Back to Top

J

Justification Required

If your property meets all applicable Guiding Principle requirements, it is in compliance with the Guiding Principles. If the agency deems a required action inapplicable for the property, select "N/A" for that action and provide a justification in the "Required Justification" field. A required action cannot be deemed inapplicable because of difficulty or cost, unless otherwise stated in the Guiding Principles text.
Back to Top

K

K-12 School

K-12 School refers to buildings or campuses used as a school for Kindergarten through 12th grade students. This does not include college or university classroom facilities/laboratories, or vocational, technical, trade, adult, or continuing education schools.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, administrative space, conference rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, cafeterias, gymnasiums, auditoriums, laboratory classrooms, portable classrooms, greenhouses, stairways, atriums, elevator shafts, small landscaping sheds, and storage areas.

The ENERGY STAR score for K-12 School does not apply to preschool or day care buildings; in order to classify as K-12 school, more than 75% of the students must be in kindergarten or older.
Back to Top

L

Laboratory

Laboratory refers to buildings that provide controlled conditions in which scientific research, measurement, and experiments are performed or practical science is taught.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including workstations/hoods, offices, conference rooms, storage areas, decontamination rooms, mechanical rooms, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Letters of Intent - Architect of Record and Building Owner

There are two required "Letters of Intent" for the SEDI:
  • The Architect of Record (AOR) Letter of Intent, from the AOR firm, confirms the validity of the information in the Statement of Energy Design Intent (SEDI) for the Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR.
  • The Building Owner Letter of Intent confirms the building owners intent to operate the building to earn EPA’s ENERGY STAR certification once it is constructed and occupied. There are two different letters depending on the type of building owner:

Library

Library refers to buildings used to store and manage collections of literary and artistic materials such as books, periodicals, newspapers, films, etc. that can be used for reference or lending.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including circulation rooms, storage areas, reading/study rooms, administrative space, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, conference rooms and auditoriums, fitness areas for staff, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Licensed Bed Capacity

Licensed Bed Capacity is the total number of beds that your hospital is licensed to have in operation. This may be more than your Staffed Beds, which are those that are set up and ready for use.

Licensed Professional

A Licensed Professional must validate the property information that appears on applications for ENERGY STAR certification. At this time, EPA requires that the licensed professional be a Professional Engineer (PE) or Registered Architect (RA).
  • A Professional Engineer (PE) is an engineer who is registered or licensed within certain jurisdictions (usually a state) to offer professional engineering services directly to the public.
  • A Registered Architect (RA) is an architect who is registered or licensed within a certain jurisdiction (usually a state) to offer professional architectural design services directly to the public.

Lifestyle Center

Lifestyle Center refers to a mixed use commercial development that includes retail stores and leisure amenities, where individual retail stores typically contain an entrance accessible from the outside and are not connected by internal walkways. Lifestyle centers have an open air design, unlike traditional enclosed malls, and often include landscaped pedestrian areas, as well as streets and vehicle parking.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including retail stores, offices, food courts, restaurants, residential areas, storage areas, staff break rooms, walkways, stairwells, and mechanical areas. Do not include any exterior spaces such as pedestrian walkways or vehicle parking areas.

Live Environment

Location of Pool

Location of Pool indicates whether your swimming pool is located indoor or outdoor.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

M

Mailing Center/Post Office

Mailing Center/Post Office refers to buildings used as retail establishments dedicated to mail and mailing supplies. This includes U.S. Post Offices, in addition to private retailers that offer priority mail services and mailing supplies.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including retail counters, administrative space, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, conference rooms, storage areas, stairways, and mechanical rooms.

Manufacturing/Industrial Plant

Manufacturing/Industrial Plant refers to buildings used for manufacturing or assembling goods. Typically a Manufacturing/Industrial plant includes a main production area that has high-ceilings and contains heavy equipment used for assembly line production.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) at the plant, including production areas, offices, conference rooms, employee break rooms, storage areas, mechanical rooms, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Maximum Number of Floors

The Maximum Number of Floors refers to the number of floors in the tallest building at the property.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Maximum Resident Capacity

The Maximum Resident Capacity is the licensed capacity for the total number of residents that the property was designed to house.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Medical Office

Medical Office refers to buildings used to provide diagnosis and treatment for medical, dental, or psychiatric outpatient care.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, exam rooms, laboratories, lobbies, atriums, conference rooms and auditoriums, employee break rooms and kitchens, rest rooms, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, and storage areas. If you have restaurants, retail (pharmacy), or services (dry cleaners) within the Medical Office, you should most likely include this square footage and energy in the Medical Office Property Use. There are 4 exceptions to this rule when you should create a separate Property Use:
  • If it is a a Property Use Type that can get an ENERGY STAR Score (note: Retail can only get a score if it is greater than 5,000 square feet)
  • If it accounts for more than 25% of the property's GFA
  • If it is a vacant/unoccupied Office
  • If the Hours of Operation differ by more than 10 hours from the main Property Use
More on this rule.

Metered Areas

Metered Areas is a designation of what areas within your building are covered by your energy and water meters. You may choose from the following options:
  • Total energy (or water) consumption for the whole building
  • Consumption for tenant areas only
  • Consumption for common areas only
  • Consumption for a combination of tenant and common areas, where you select all of the following which apply:
    • Tenant Heating
    • Tenant Cooling
    • Tenant Hot Water
    • Tenant Plug Load/Electricity
    • Common Area Heating
    • Common Area Cooling
    • Common Area Hot Water
    • Common Area Load/Electricity
  • Consumption for a different configuration. You should use this option if you do not think any of the above apply for your property, for example maybe your meters may include a cell phone tower that is unrelated to your operation
Note that this designation is set separately for energy and water meters. For example, your water meters may reflect the total water consumption at your property, but your energy meters may cover common areas only.

Meter ID

Meter ID is the unique identifier for the meter. Each meter is given a unique Meter ID when it is first created in Portfolio Manager.

Metric Year

A Metric Year is a 12-month period starting on the first day of one month, and ending 12 months later on the last day of that month (ex: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014). All metrics in Portfolio Manager are calculated based on 12 full calendar months of data. The 12-month period associated with a given metric is often represented by the Year Ending Date which is the last day of the 12-month period. For example, if your Year Ending Date is 12/31/2012, your metrics would be based on the calendar year of 2012.

There are three particular Metric Years of interest for a property:
  • Baseline Year is the 12-month period used as a historic point of comparison. Portfolio Manager will default your Baseline Year to the first 12-month period for which you have data. You can change it on the Goals tab. You can also set a different baseline date for energy and for water.
  • Current Year is the most current 12-month period for which you have 12 full months of data. For example, if you update your bills every month, then your Current Year will always be the 12-months ending with most recent month that you entered your bills. A different Current Year is determined for energy and water, based on the most current meter data.
  • “Your Choice” Year is a 12-month period which you select. For example, if you are running a report, you can select any 12-month period to view metrics. Or, if you are applying for ENERGY STAR Certification, you may have several different Years (each represented by the last day of that 12-month period) to choose from.

Mixed Use Property

Mixed Use Property refers to buildings that contain a variety of commercial and/or residential uses where no individual use accounts for more than 50% of the property.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building including, commercial/retail areas, administrative offices, hotels, residential units, lobbies, atriums, mechanical rooms, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Months in Use

Months in Use is the total number of months that your property is open for standard activities.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Movie Theater

Movie theater refers to buildings used for public or private film screenings.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including seating areas, lobbies, concession stands, bathrooms, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Multifamily Housing

Multifamily Housing refers to residential buildings that contain two or more residential living units. These properties may include high-rise buildings (10 or more stories), mid-rise buildings (5 to 9 stories), low-rise buildings (1 to 4 stories), townhomes broken into two or more units, or duplex homes. Occupants of these buildings may include tenants, cooperators, and/or individual owners.

Gross Floor Area should include all buildings that are part of a multifamily community or property, including any separate management offices or other buildings that may not contain living units. Gross Floor Area should include all fully-enclosed space within the exterior walls of the building(s) including living space in each unit (including occupied and unoccupied units), interior common areas (e.g. lobbies, offices, community rooms, common kitchens, fitness rooms, indoor pools), hallways, stairwells, elevator shafts, connecting corridors between buildings, storage areas, and mechanical space such as a boiler room. Open air stairwells, breezeways, and other similar areas that are not fully-enclosed should not be included in the Gross Floor Area.

The ENERGY STAR score for Multifamily Housing is available only to properties with 20 units or more. There is also a 75% occupancy requirement for certification. Townhome-only communities are not eligible (as long as townhomes are less than 50% of the total units the property is eligible).

Multifamily Housing - Number of Residential Living Units in a High-Rise Setting (10 or more Stories)

The count of all individual private apartments/ condominiums (both occupied and unoccupied) located in individual buildings that are 10 or more stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this range (e.g. if Wing A is 10 stories and Wing B is 5 stories, only units in Wing A would be counted here).

Multifamily Housing - Number of Residential Living Units in a Low-Rise Setting (1-4 Stories)

The count of all individual private apartments/ condominiums (both occupied and unoccupied)located in individual buildings that are 1 to 4 stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this height range (e.g. if Wing A is 6 stories and Wing B is 3 stories, only units in Wing B would be counted here).

Multifamily Housing - Number of Residential Living Units in a Mid-Rise Setting (5-9 Stories)

The count of all individual private apartments/ condominiums (both occupied and unoccupied) located in individual buildings that are 5 to 9 stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this height range (e.g. if Wing A is 6 stories and Wing B is 3 stories, only units in Wing A would be counted here).

Museum

Museum refers to buildings that display collections to outside visitors for public viewing and enjoyment and for informational/educational purposes.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including public collection display areas, meeting rooms, classrooms, gift shops, food service areas, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas for collections, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

My Permissions to Property

My Properties vs. Other People's Properties

"My Properties" are the properties for which you are the Property Data Administrator. "Other People’s Properties" are the properties in your portfolio that other people have shared with you. You can have varying levels of administrative rights on these properties (Full Access, Read Only, Custom Access, or Exchange Data).
Back to Top

N

National Median

The National Median is the median reference point for your property based on the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The national median is an extremely useful benchmark: 50% of properties perform below the median, and 50% perform above the median. The exact way the median is determined will depend on your property:
  • If your property has an ENERGY STAR score - The national median is the Source EUI that will give your specific property an ENERGY STAR score of 50. This means the median is normalized to account for weather and business activity, telling you what a median building with your activities would consume. Using the median Source EUI for a score of 50, other metrics like the equivalent cost and GHG emissions at the median can be computed.
  • If your property does not have an ENERGY STAR score - The national median is the Source EUI from CBECS, without any normalization for either weather or operation. Table of National Median values for reference on our website. Using the median Source EUI, other metrics like the equivalent cost and GHG emissions at the median can be computed.

Non-Refrigerated Warehouse

Non-Refrigerated Warehouse refers to unrefrigerated buildings that are used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise or raw materials.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including the main storage rooms, administrative office offices, lobbies, stairways, restrooms, equipment storage areas, and elevator shafts. This should not include exterior/outdoor loading bays or docks.

Notes

Notes is a free text field in which you may enter any remarks or details about property.

Number of Bedrooms

The Number of Bedrooms should reflect the total number of bedrooms located in each individual apartment unit at the property.

For example, if you have 100 apartments broken out as follows, your Number of Bedrooms would be 175:

  • 25 are 3 bedrooms (25 * 3 = 75)
  • 25 are 2 bedrooms (25 * 2 = 50)
  • 25 are 1 bedroom   (25 * 1 = 25)
  • 25 are studios        (25 * 1 = 25)

Note:

  • Efficiency and studio apartments count as one (1) bedroom.
  • A junior one bedroom (a unit with a separate space for sleeping and usually separated by a half wall or temporary wall) count as one (1) bedroom.
  • Don't include in-unit common areas (ex: living rooms) being used as bedrooms by tenants.
  • Count what you have today, including any additions/modifications to the original unit(s).

Number of Buildings

Number of Buildings indicates the total number of buildings that are located on a multi-building property. You enter this value into Portfolio Manager whenever you create a multi-building property.

Please note that this value is not the number of buildings that have been individually benchmarked on a multi-building property. For example, you may operate a large university campus with 85 buildings. When you benchmark your property you indicate that there are 85 buildings, but you may only have building-level data to track 4 individual buildings on your campus. In this case, the Number of Buildings is still listed as 85, as you entered it.

Number of Cash Registers

Number of Cash Registers is the total number of cash registers. Cash registers are defined as physical machines that are used primarily for conducting transactions and indicating to customers the amounts of individual sales; they record and total receipts, may automatically calculate the change due, and often include a money drawer from which to make change. Do not include handheld point of sale devices.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Commercial Refrigeration/Freezer Units

Number of Commercial Refrigeration/Freezer Units is the total Number of Open or Closed Refrigeration/Freezer Units and the total Number of Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezer Units.
  • The Number of Open or Closed Refrigeration/Freezer Units is the count of open or closed cases that are used for the sale or storage of perishable goods. This includes display-type refrigerated open or closed cases and cabinets as well as display-type freezer units typically found on a sales floor. Each case or cabinet section, typically 4 to 12 feet in length, should be considered 1 unit. Include those cases located inside and immediately adjacent to the building. These units may be portable or permanent, and may have doors, plastic strips, or other flexible cover. This count should not include vending machines.
  • The Number of Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezer Units is the total count of walk-in units at the property. Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezers are typically very large units located in storage areas or commercial kitchens that would not be accessible to all building occupants. This count should only include large storage units that a person actually walks into in order to store or retrieve perishable goods.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

In addition, please note these specific property type considerations:
  • Hotels – May include Ice Makers in this count.
  • Worship Facility – This count should reflect commercial sized units that are often associated with food storage and preparation for community events. The count should include commercial sized units only, and should not include any residential-type units.

Number of Commercial Washing Machines

The Number of Commercial Washing Machines is a count of all commercial-type washing machines. Commercial units are designed with a large capacity for the commercial processing of linens and other laundry. This count should include washing machines only, and should not include any dryers. Do not include residential machines, such as coin-operated machines available for resident use.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Computers

The Number of Computers is the total number of desktop computers, laptops, and data servers at the property. This number should not include tablet computers, such as iPads, or any other types of office equipment.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

In addition, please note these specific property type considerations:
  • K-12 School – The count should only reflect computers that are owned by the school. It should not include any computers that are brought onsite by students or staff.
  • Senior Care Community – The count should reflect computers used in administrative areas, computers in common areas available for residents and visitors, and wall-mounted computers in resident units for medical purposes. This count should not include any computers owned by residents that may be present in individual apartments or rooms. This is a count of computers only and should not include other electronic or medical equipment.

Number of Concert/Show Events Per Year

Number of Concert/Show Events per Year is the total number of concerts, shows, or similar events that occur each year. If the event, like a circus, spans multiple days, each showing should be counted as a separate event. Also, it may be possible to have multiple events at the same venue on the same day (e.g., afternoon and evening performances), in which case each event would be counted separately. Note that this is a count of concert and show type events and does not include sporting events or special/other events, which are counted separately.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Full-Time Equivalent Workers

The Number of Full Time Equivalent Workers should be computed as the total number of hours worked by all workers in a week divided by the standard hours worked by one full time worker in a week. Workers may include employees of the property, sub-contractors who are onsite regularly, and volunteers who perform regular onsite tasks. Workers should not include visitors to the property such as clients, customers, or patients.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Guest Meals Served Per Year

The Number of Guest Meals Served Per Year is a count of the guest meals that are prepared and served at this property each year – including room service, in-restaurant dining, and banquets/special events. Many hotels will refer to this metric as “food & beverage covers.”

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Laundry Hookups in All Units

The Number of Laundry Hookups in All Units is a count of all laundry hookups located in individual apartment units. You should include all hookups that are available, even if the machine is inoperable or absent. For the purposes of counting hookups, each machine (individual washer, individual dryer, or combination/stacked unit) should be counted as one hookup.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Laundry Hookups in Common Area(s)

The Number of Laundry Hookups in Common Areas is a count of all laundry hookups located in common areas, which may be either pay-per-use or free machines. You should include all hookups that are available, even if the machine is inoperable or absent. For the purposes of counting hookups, each machine (individual washer, individual dryer, or combination/stacked unit) should be counted as one hookup.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of MRI Machines

The Number of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines is a count of the MRIs that are present at the property. You should only include MRIs that are permanently at the property, which may include machines present in a mobile trailer only if the mobile trailer is present for 10 or more months. Do not include any other imaging equipment (X-ray, CT Scan, etc.).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Open or Closed Refrigeration/Freezer Units

The Number of Open or Closed Refrigeration/Freezer Units is the count of open or closed cases that are used for the sale or storage of perishable goods. This includes display-type refrigerated open or closed cases and cabinets as well as display-type freezer units typically found on a sales floor. Each case or cabinet section, typically 4 to 12 feet in length, should be considered 1 unit. Include those cases located inside and immediately adjacent to the building. These units may be portable or permanent, and may have doors, plastic strips, or other flexible cover. This count should not include vending machines.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of People

This is the total number of people living in a single family home.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of People with Access to Property

Number of Residential Electronic Lift Systems

The Number of Residential Electronic Lift Systems is a count of all residential electronic lift systems at the property. A lift system is an assistive device that transfers residents between a bed and a chair, or other place, using hydraulic power. This count should include portable and permanent sling lifts, wheelchair lifts, and entry systems. Do not include manual lifts.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Residential Washing Machines

The Number of Residential Washing Machines is a count of all residential washing machines at the property. Residential Washing Machines are standard units that may be found in individual units or common laundry areas, such as coin-operated machines available for resident use. This count should include washing machines only, and should not include any dryers. Do not include residential machines and not commercial machines.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Rooms

The Number of Rooms is the total number of rooms at the property, including occupied rooms, non-occupied rooms, rooms in the process of being renovated and rooms for permanent house/administrative use. This number will often be included in promotional and marketing materials.

In addition, please note these specific property type considerations:
  • Dormitory – This count reflects individual rooms, which may be occupied by more than one student.
  • Hotel – This count reflects guest rooms.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Special/Other Events Per Year

Number of Special/Other Events per Year is the total number of specialty events that occur each year. These events do not require the use of the entire venue and include weddings, banquets, conferences or meetings. If the event spans multiple days, each day the event is held should be counted as a separate event. Also, it may be possible to have multiple events at the same venue on the same day (e.g., afternoon and evening performances), in which case each event would be counted separately. Note that this is a count of specialty events only and does not include sporting events or concert events, which are counted separately.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Sporting Events Per Year

Number of Sporting Events per Year is the total number of sporting events that occur each year. Each event should be counted only once. Also, it may be possible to have multiple events at the same venue on the same day (e.g., afternoon and evening games), in which case each event would be counted separately. Note that this is a count of sporting events only and does not include concert events or special/other events, which are counted separately.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Staffed Beds

The Number of Staffed Beds is the number of beds set up and staffed for use by inpatients. This count does not include newborn bassinets, labor room, post anesthesia, or postoperative recovery room beds, psychiatric holding beds, and beds that are used only as holding facilities for patients prior to their transfer to another hospital/inpatient facility.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Surgical Operating Beds

The Number of Surgical Operating Beds is a count of beds where surgical procedures not requiring an overnight hospital stay are performed. These procedures are more intensive than those done in a doctor’s office but not so intensive as to require a hospital stay. Many knee, shoulder, eye, and spine surgeries, and Colonoscopy services, fall within this scope.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezer Units

The Number of Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezer Units is the total count of walk-in units at the property. Walk-in Refrigeration/Freezers are typically very large units located in storage areas or commercial kitchens that would not be accessible to all building occupants. This count should only include large storage units that a person actually walks into in order to store or retrieve perishable goods.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Number of Workers on Main Shift

The Number of Workers on Main Shift should reflect the total number of workers present during the primary shift. This is not a total count of workers, but rather a count of workers who are present at the same time. For example, if there are two daily eight hour shifts of 100 workers each, the Number of Workers on Main Shift value is 100. Number of Workers on Main Shift may include employees of the property, sub-contractors who are onsite regularly, and volunteers who perform regular onsite tasks. Number of Workers should not include visitors to the buildings such as clients, customers, or patients.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Nutrient Removal

Nutrient removal is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – There is a nutrient removal process(es). Nutrient removal is considered to be any process included for the purpose of removing nutrients (i.e., nitrogen, phosphorous). This may include biological nitrification, biological denitrification, phosphorus removal, or recirculating sand filters. This same question about nutrient removal is asked in EPA’s Community Watershed Needs Survey.
  • No – There is not nutrient removal at the plant
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

O

Occupancy

Occupancy is the percentage of your property’s Gross Floor Area (GFA) that is occupied and operational. For example, if you have a 10 story office building, that on average has 9 of its 10 floors fully leased and occupied, the occupancy would be 90%. There is only one Occupancy rate for each property as a whole.

You enter your Occupancy when you first create the property, and you can change it on the Details tab. Here are instructions for what to do when your occupancy fluctuates.

The value you enter for occupancy will not affect your ENERGY STAR Score or any other metrics. Your Score is based on your specific Use Details (Number of Workers, Computers, etc). So, when you have changes to occupancy/vacancy in your property, you need to update your Use Details to accurately reflect the activity at your property.

The value you enter for occupancy could affect your eligibility for ENERGY STAR certification. We have the following minimum occupancy requirements:

  • Office/Bank/Courthouse/Financial Center – 50%
  • Hotel - 55%
  • Multifamily – 75%
If you are not seeking certification for one of the above property types, you may not find Occupancy very useful (though it is required, so enter a good guess and move on). But, you may find it helpful to compare properties with different occupancy levels across your portfolio using custom reports.

Today, you enter a single occupancy rate, but you cannot track changes over time or see values from previous years. However, the ability to track values over time is on our “wish list” of possible enhancements and when built you will be able to compare your occupancy rate with your energy/water usage for each property.

Office

Office refers to buildings used for the conduct of commercial or governmental business activities. This includes administrative and professional offices.

Gross Floor Area (GFA) should include all space within the building(s) including offices, conference rooms and auditoriums, break rooms, kitchens, lobbies, fitness areas, basements, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

If you have restaurants, retail, or services (dry cleaners) within the Office, you should most likely include this square footage and energy in the Office Property Use. There are 4 exceptions to this rule when you should create a separate Property Use:
  • If it is a Property Use Type that can get an ENERGY STAR Score (note: Retail can only get a score if it is greater than 5,000 square feet)
  • If it accounts for more than 25% of the property's GFA
  • If it is a vacant/unoccupied Office
  • If the Hours of Operation differ by more than 10 hours from the main Property Use
More on this rule.

Onsite Laundry Facility

Onsite Laundry Facility is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property contains an onsite laundry facility to provide commercial laundry services. Sometimes these laundry facilities will launder not only linens associated with the property itself, but also laundry for other similar facilities (e.g. a central laundry plant at one hotel that serves several hotels in the city).
  • No – The property does not contain an on-site laundry facility.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Onsite Renewable Systems

Onsite Renewable Systems are electric generation systems located at your property that produces Green Power. You can track two types of Onsite Renewable Systems in Portfolio Manager: solar panels and wind turbines. Each unit of electricity (kWh) that is produced by your Onsite Renewable System comes along with a Renewable Energy Certificate (REC), which quantifies the environmental benefit. But, the REC and the electricity (kWh) can actually be sold separately. That is, you may use all of the electricity in your building, but sell the RECs to someone else. If you do this, then you can no longer claim that you are using Green Power. To help you understand the energy generation and environmental benefit of your system we offer a number of key metrics:
  • Electricity Use – Generated from Onsite Renewable System (kWh) – is the total amount energy produced from your onsite solar panels or wind turbines. This total amount can be broken into two parts:
    • Electricity Use – Generated from Onsite Renewable Systems and Exported (kWh)– is the portion of the energy that was produced from your solar panels or wind turbines that you exported (you did not use).
    • Electricity Use – Generated from Onsite Renewable Systems and Used Onsite (kWh) – is the portion of the energy that was produced from your solar/wind systems that was used at your property. If you retained all of the RECs for the energy, this will be the same as your “Green power – Onsite (kWh).”
  • Percent of Electricity Sourced from Onsite Renewable Systems – is the percentage of your total electricity use that is supplied by your onsite renewable system. For example, if you use 60 kWh from your onsite renewable system and you also purchase 40 kWh from the grid, then your Percent Electricity Sourced from Onsite Renewable Systems is 60% (60/100). This is not affected by any renewable energy that you exported.
  • Percent of RECs Retained– is the percentage of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) that you kept compared to the total quantity of RECs that is associated with the total amount of renewable energy you generated.
  • Green Power –Onsite – is the power generated from an onsite renewable system. The only types of onsite green power currently tracked in Portfolio Manager are solar and wind power. Energy use from these systems is green only if you retain the rights to the RECs associated with the power generated by your system. If you sell the RECs (for example, through REC arbitrage), then you do not have onsite green power.
  • Avoided Emissions –Onsite Green Power - occur when you have an onsite renewable electric system and you retain the rights to the Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) , which convey/define the environmental benefits of your system. This is the avoided emissions effectively resulting from your onsite system.

Open Parking Lot Size

Open Parking Lot is a paved area that is lit and use for parking vehicles. Open Parking Lot Size refers specifically to open area, which may include small shading covers but does not include any full structures with roofs. Parking lot size may include the area of parking spots, lanes, and driveways. If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Operational Target

Other

Other refers to buildings that do not fall within the available property use categories in Portfolio Manager. Before selecting Other, it is highly recommended that you review the full list of property uses available for selection to ensure that there is not a suitable category for your property.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including space devoted to your main business activity, administrative offices, employee break rooms, bathrooms, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Other - Education

Other – Education refers to buildings used for religious, community, or other educational purposes not described in the available property uses in Portfolio Manager (i.e. educational purposes other than adult education, college/university, K-12 school, pre-school/daycare and vocational schools).

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, administrative space, conference rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, cafeterias, auditoriums, laboratory classrooms, stairways, elevator shafts, and storage areas.

Other - Entertainment/Public Assembly

Other-Entertainment/Public Assembly refers to buildings whose primary use is for entertainment or public gatherings and that do not meet the definition of any other property use defined in Portfolio Manager.

Gross floor area should include all space within the building(s), including entertainment areas, administrative areas, and supporting areas such as storage rooms, hallways, restrooms, stairways, and maintenance areas.

Other - Lodging/Residential

Other – Lodging/Residential refers to buildings used for residential purposes other than those described in the available property uses in Portfolio Manager (i.e. residential other than multifamily residential, single family home, senior care community, residence hall/dormitory, barracks, prison/incarceration, or hotel).

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including living areas, common areas, administrative space, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, waiting areas, cafeterias, stairways, atriums, elevator shafts, and storage areas.

Other - Mall

Other-Mall refers to buildings containing a collection of stores whose purpose is the sale of goods, but which do not fit into the enclosed mall, lifestyle center, or strip mall property types.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including retail stores, offices, food courts, restaurants, storage areas, staff break rooms, walkways, stairwells, and mechanical areas.

Other - Public Services

Other – Public Services refers to buildings used by public-sector organizations to provide public services other than those described in the available property uses in Portfolio Manager (i.e. services other than offices, courthouses, drinking water treatment and distribution plants, fire stations, libraries, mailing centers or post offices, police stations, prisons or incarceration facilities, social or meeting halls, transportation terminals or stations, or wastewater treatment plants).

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including administrative space, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, waiting areas, cafeterias, stairways, atriums, elevator shafts, landscaping sheds, and storage areas.

Other - Recreation

Other-Recreation refers to buildings primarily used for recreation that do not meet the definition of any other property use defined in Portfolio Manager.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including recreational areas and supporting activities such as mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Other - Restaurant/Bar

Other – Restaurant/Bar refers to buildings used for preparation and sale of ready-to-eat food and beverages, but which does not fit into the fast food restaurant, restaurant, or bar/nightclub property types.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including kitchens, sales areas, dining areas, staff break rooms, and storage areas. Gross Floor Area should not include any outdoor/exterior seating areas, but the energy use of these outdoor areas should be reported on your energy meters.

Other - Services

Other - Services refers to buildings in which primarily services are offered, but which does not fit into the Personal Services or Repair Services property types. Examples include kennels, photo processing shops, etc.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, offices, storage areas, staff break rooms, walkways, and stairwells.

Other - Specialty Hospital

Other/Specialty Hospitals refers to long-term acute care hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation facilities, including Cancer Centers and Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals/Facilities.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) on the campus including: medical offices, patient rooms, laboratories, lobbies, atriums, cafeterias, rest rooms, stairways, corridors connecting buildings, storage areas, elevator shafts.

Other - Stadium

Other-Stadium refers to buildings primarily used for sporting events that do not meet the definition of any other property use defined in Portfolio Manager.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including areas for athletic activity and spectator seating and supporting activities such as mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Other - Technology/Science

Other – Technology/Science refers to buildings used for science and technology related services other than Laboratories and Data Centers.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including areas with the main business activity, production areas, administrative offices, employee break areas, stairways, atriums, elevator shafts, and storage areas.

Other - Utility

Other – Utility applies to buildings used by a utility for some purpose other than general office or energy/power generation. This may include utility transfer stations or maintenance facilities. Note that an administrative office occupied by a utility should be entered as Office, and a power or energy generation plant should be entered as Energy/Power Station.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including administrative space, maintenance and equipment areas, generator rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, meeting rooms, stairways, elevator shafts, and storage areas. This should not include any exterior spaces associated with utility operations.

Outpatient Rehabilitation/Physical Therapy

Outpatient Rehabilitation/Physical Therapy offices refers to buildings used to provide diagnosis and treatment for rehabilitation and physical therapy.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, exam rooms, waiting rooms, indoor pool areas, atriums, employee break rooms and kitchens, rest rooms, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.

Owned By

Owned By is the designation for the primary ownership of your property. There are three options:
  • Non-profit – This is intended for community-based not-for-profit organizations, including religious organizations.
  • For- profit – This is intended for either public or private entities that operate for a profit.
  • Government – These are government-owned facilities, which may include local, state, or Federal facilities (including Veteran’s Administration and military facilities).
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

P

Parent Property

Parking

Parking refers to buildings and lots used for parking vehicles. This includes open parking lots, partially enclosed parking structures, and completely enclosed (or underground) parking structures. Parking structures may be free standing or physically connected to the property.

Partial Building

Partially Enclosed Parking Garage Size

Partially Enclosed Parking Garage is the total area of any parking structure that is not fully enclosed. This includes parking garages where each level is covered at the top, but the sides are partially or fully open – that is, structures that have partial walls or no walls at all.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

People with Access to Property

Percent That Can Be Cooled

Percent That Can Be Cooled is the total percentage of your property that can be cooled by mechanical equipment. This includes all types of cooling from central air to individual window units.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Percent That Can Be Heated

Percent That Can Be Heated is the total percentage of your property that can be heated by mechanical equipment.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Performing Arts

Performing Arts refers to buildings used for public or private artistic or musical performances.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including seating, stage and backstage areas, food service areas, retail areas, rehearsal studios, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Permissions

When you share a property, you determine the specific information that is shared and the specific actions that can performed on the property. There are four permission levels:
  • Read Only Access is the ability to view all information about your property, but not to make any additions or changes. For example, the person could view your energy usage but could not make corrections or add new energy bills. Read Only Access does NOT come with the ability to share the property with other people (Share Forward). If you want someone to be able to "Share Forward" but have Read Only Access to your meters and other information, you can make this selection under Custom Access.
  • Full Access is the ability to view and edit your property. With Full Access, a person can do all of the same things you can, except delete the property. Full Access automatically comes with the ability to "Share Forward," which means the person with whom you share can also share that property with others. If you want someone to have Full Access to all the property data, but NOT be able to "Share Forward," then you need to share with Custom Access.
  • Custom Access allows you to select more granular permissions for each person you are sharing with. First, you select None, Read Only, or Full Access for each type of data (Property, Meters, Goals, Recognition). By default, all selections are set to Read Only. If you want someone to be able to add meter bill data, you must select Full Access for that meter. If you want someone to be able to add new meters (or delete meters, edit information about your meters, or change the associations for your meter), then you need to select "Full Access" for Property Information. Choosing “None” will suppresses access to that specific tab, but annual metrics for the property are still accessible via Reporting. After you set permissions for viewing and editing your data, you decide whether you want to give "Share Forward" rights, meaning the ability to share the property with others.
    • Note that when you grant "Share Forward," the person cannot share with more permissions than they have. For example, if you select Read Only for every type of data (Property, meters, and certification) then the person can Share Forward, but can only grant Read Access, not Full Access, to your data.
  • Exchange Data allows you to select an organization (which is registered to use web services) to exchange data with your Portfolio Manager account. You will be able to specify specific permissions regarding whether the organization will be able to view or modify Property, Building, and Meter information. Choosing “None” will suppresses access to that specific tab, but annual metrics for the property are still accessible via Reporting. You will also decide if you want to grant "Share Forward" rights, meaning the ability to share the property with others.
    • Note: When sharing to exchange data, you may also be required to provide additional information to the organization so that they can process your request to exchange data with Portfolio Manager.

Personal Services (Health/Beauty, Dry Cleaning, etc)

Personal Services refers to buildings used to sell services rather than physical goods. Examples include dry cleaners, salons, spas, etc.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, offices, storage areas, staff break rooms, walkways, and stairwells.

Plant Design Flow Rate

Plant Design Flow Rate is the capacity for which a water or wastewater treatment facility has been designed. It must be entered in Million Gallons per Day (MGD).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Plant Flow Rate Meter

A plant flow rate meter applies to Wastewater Treatment Plants and Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution Plants. This meter is used to track the flow of water going through the plant. You can update the flow rate regularly using weekly, monthly, or quarterly entries to the Flow Rate Meter.

Police Station

Police Station applies to buildings used for federal, state, or local police forces and their associated office space.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including offices, temporary holding cells, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, atriums, conference rooms and auditoriums, fitness areas for staff, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Portfolio Manager ID

Power Generation Plant

Pre-school/Daycare

Pre-school/Daycare applies to buildings used for educational programs or daytime supervision/recreation for young children before they attend Kindergarten.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, administrative space, conference rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, cafeterias, gymnasiums, auditoriums, stairways, elevator shafts, and storage areas.

Primary Business or Service

The primary category that your business falls into. If more than two apply, pick the best one.

Primary Function

Prison/Incarceration

Prison/Incarceration refers to federal, state, local, or private-sector buildings used for the detention of persons awaiting trial or convicted of crimes.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including holding cells, cafeterias, administrative spaces, kitchens, lobbies, atriums, conference rooms and auditoriums, fitness areas, storage areas, stairways, and elevator shafts.

Professional Engineer (PE)

Progress and Goals Report

The Progress & Goals Report is a comparison table of a building’s energy use, including baseline, current, property’s set target, and national median. This report may be needed to for applying for a grant or responding to a competition.

Property Access

Property Access defines the administrative permissions that you or someone else have regarding a particular property. If you are the Property Data Administrator then you have full “property access.” When you share a property you can specify the property access as: Full Access, Read Only, Custom, or Exchange Data.

Property Data Administrator

The Property Data Administrator is the person who owns the account where the property was initially entered. We didn't call this person the "Property Owner" to avoid confusion with the person who "owns" the lease or deed to the building.

Property Data Administrator - Account ID

Property Data Administrator - Account ID is the unique identifier for the Property Data Administrator’s account (the person or account who currently “owns” the property record).

Property Gross Floor Area

Your property’s Gross Floor Area (GFA) is tracked in four different metrics:
  • Property GFA – Self-Reported is the number you enter when you first create a property. It can be edited on the Details tab, under “Basic Information.” This value does not change over time, and it is not time weighted. If you edit it, it deletes the previous value without saving a record of what it had been.
  • Property GFA - EPA Calculated (Buildings and Parking) is the sum of the GFA of all the Property Uses that you entered on the Details tab, including parking GFA. This value is time weighted.
  • Property GFA - EPA Calculated (Buildings) is the sum of the GFA of all the Property Uses that you entered on the Details tab, excluding parking GFA. This number should match your “Property GFA – Self-Reported.” If you have Property Uses that change square footage frequently (like office space going vacant), this is a good check to make sure all of your Property Uses add up to the right number. This value is time weighted.
  • Property GFA - EPA Calculated (Parking) is the sum of the GFA of your “Partially Enclosed” and “Completely Enclosed” Parking Property Uses that you entered on the Details tab. This value is time weighted.

Property ID

A Property ID is a unique identifier for your property that can be used by EPA, you, or other organizations to track and manage your property. There are four main types of IDs:
  • Portfolio Manager ID - This is a unique ID assigned by EPA to each property. Remember that a property can be a portion of a building, a single building, or a campus of buildings. If your property is a campus of buildings and you benchmark each building, then your individual buildings will also be assigned individual IDs, and the ID for the campus is referred to as the Parent Property ID.
  • Custom ID - A custom ID is an ID that you can set, for example, it could be an ID associated with your company or an ID for a campaign in which you are participating. When you enter a Custom ID, you can enter both a name for the ID and its actual value. For example: (Company ABC Inventory ID, 01234). When you search for these custom IDs in reports, you will see them only as Custom ID 1, Custom ID 2, and Custom ID 3, because Custom ID 1 could be different for different properties in your portfolio.
  • Standard ID - A standard ID is a special type of ID with a set name that is available within Portfolio Manager. These are IDs associated with local legislation, national campaigns, or other large benchmarking activities. For example, New York City uses the Borough Block and Lot (BBL) number to track buildings in their jurisdiction. To enter a standard ID you can select the ID name from our dropdown list and then enter the value. See Standard ID for a full list.

Property Manager

Property Primary Contact

Property Relationships

Property relationships describe the connection between two buildings. When you are benchmark a campus (or, collection of buildings) you can track information for the entire campus, as well as for individual buildings on the campus. If you choose to track at both of these levels, then you have "parent-child" relationship:
  • Parent Property – The "parent" is the entire campus or complex. That is, the parent is the multi-building property for which you have also chosen to benchmark individual buildings separately. For example, a high school has 2 buildings: the main classroom building and a separate gymnasium. When you enter the high school you will designate it as a multi-building property with two buildings. If you choose to enter and track the classroom building and gymnasium individually, then your high school property is called the "parent property" while the classroom building and gymnasium are "children" properties.
  • Child Property – The "child" buildings are the individual buildings on a campus. In the example above, the two "child" buildings are the main school and the gymnasium. As a best practice, we recommend that you benchmark the parent property and the individual child buildings, if possible.

Note: A Child building can have 2 parents. But a building cannot be both a parent and a child (no nesting of campuses). Read our FAQs with more information on campuses.

Property Type

The property type indicates the single, primary use of your property. However, there are two different property types:
  • Property Type - Self-Selected – This is the primary property type that you select. You select the type with which you most closely identify and you can change it at any time (on the Details tab, under Basic Information).
  • Property Type - EPA Calculated – EPA calculates a property type based on the property uses that you have entered. This is the property type that accounts for more than 50% of your property. If no individual property type accounts for more than 50%, then it will be designated as Mixed Use. For example, if you enter an Office that accounts for 60% of your Gross Floor Area (GFA) and a Retail store that accounts for 40% of your GFA, the "EPA Calculated" Property Type will be "Office." The EPA Calculated property type is used to determine your peer group for comparisons to the national median. However, the ENERGY STAR scores for Mixed Use properties will account for all property uses within the score.

Property Types at your Property

There are several metrics to show the Property Types in a single Property:
  • List of All Property Types at Property – is a comma delimited list of all the property types for a single property, in alphabetical order.
  • Largest Property Use Type – is the name of the Property Type (ex: Office) that has the largest Gross Floor Area (GFA) for that property.
  • Largest Property Use Type – Gross Floor Area (ft²) – is the GFA for the largest Property Type.
  • 2nd Largest Property Use Type – is the name of the Property Type (ex: Office) that has the second largest GFA for that property.
  • 2nd Largest Property Use – Gross Floor Area (ft²) – is the GFA for the second largest Property Type.
  • 3rd Largest Property Use Type – is the name of the Property Type (ex: Office) that has the third largest GFA for that property.
  • 3rd Largest Property Use Type – Gross Floor Area (ft²) – is the GFA for the third largest Property Type.

Property Use Details

Property Use Details is a term referring to the business activity at your property, such as Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Workers, and Number of Computers. Each Property Type will have a different set of applicable Property Use Details (for example, Schools will have Student Seating Capacity and Retail Stores will have Number of Cash Registers). View the complete list of definitions for each Property Use Detail by Property Type.
Back to Top

R

Race Track

Race Track refers to buildings used primarily to hold racing events such as vehicle races, track/field races, horse races, and/or dog-races.

Gross Floor Area should include all spectator viewing areas, concourse space on which workers or guests can walk, concession areas, retail stores, restaurants, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. The footprint of the race track itself should also be included in the gross floor area, along with the footprint of any staging areas.

Read Only Access

Read Only Access is the ability to view all information about your property, but not to make any additions or changes. For example, the person could view your energy consumption information but could not make corrections or add new energy bills. Read Only Access does NOT come with the ability to share the property with other people (Share Forward). If you want someone to be able to "Share Forward" but have Read Only Access to your meters and other information, you can make this selection under Custom Access.

Also see Permissions.

Refrigerated Warehouse

Refrigerated Warehouse refers to refrigerated buildings that are used to store perishable goods or merchandise under refrigeration at temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), which includes temperature-controlled areas, administrative offices, lobbies, stairways, restrooms, equipment storage areas, and elevator shafts. This should not include exterior/outdoor loading bays or docks.

Regional Power Grid

Registered Architect (RA)

Renewable Energy Certificate (REC)

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) are the tradable, legal rights to the environmental benefits of green power. These rights can be sold separately from the actual electricity (kWh).  In order for power to be considered "green," and to see the benefits of green power in your metrics, you must own the RECs.

You can obtain RECs in 3 ways:
  1. You generate onsite green power (solar or wind energy). For each meter entry, you must specify the REC ownership as: Owned, Arbitrage*, or Sold.
    • You only see the benefits of green power in your metrics if you retain ownership of the RECs.
    • *REC arbitrage is when you sell the RECs that are associated with your onsite system and purchase other RECs as replacements. In this case, you cannot claim that your onsite system electricity generation is green. You may, however, claim the benefit of offsite green power associated with the replacement RECs you purchased.
  2. You purchase green power from your utility. This is considered offsite green power.
  3. You purchase RECs independent of your physical electricity. These purchases are typically made at a corporate level and are often not traceable to individual buildings. You cannot currently track these unbundled RECs at the portfolio level, but you may enter these purchases as offsite green power if you are able to attribute them to individual properties.

Repair Services (Vehicle, Shoe, Locksmith, etc)

Repair Services refers to buildings in which some type of repair service is provided. Examples include vehicle service or repair shops, shoe repair, jewelry repair, locksmiths, etc.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales floors, repair areas, workshops, offices, parts storage areas, waiting rooms, staff break rooms, hallways, and stairwells.

Report Contacts

The various ENERGY STAR Reports includes several important contacts:
  • Primary Contact is the main point of contact for the property. This is the person who people would contact with questions about the property.
  • Property Owner is the organization who owns the property/building.
  • Licensed Professional is the person who validates the property information that appears on the report. For ENERGY STAR certification, EPA requires that the Licensed Professional be either a Professional Engineer (PE) or a Registered Architect (RA). For more information, see the glossary term for Licensed Professional.

Residence Hall/Dormitory

Residence Hall/Dormitory refers to buildings associated with educational institutions or military facilities which offer multiple accommodations for long-term residents.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including bedrooms, common areas, food service facilities, laundry facilities, meeting spaces, exercise rooms, health club/spas, lobbies, elevator shafts, storage areas, and stairways.

Residential Care Facility

Residential Care Facilities refers to buildings that provide rehabilitative and restorative care to patients on a long-term or permanent basis. Residential Care Facilities treat mental health issues, substance abuse, and rehabilitation for injury, illness, and disabilities. This property type is intended for facilities that offer long-term residential care to residents of all ages who may be in need of assistance with activities of daily living. If a facility is designed to provide nursing and assistance to seniors only, then the Senior Care Community property type should be used.

Gross Floor Area should include all fully-enclosed space within the exterior walls of the building(s) including individual rooms or units, wellness centers, exam rooms, community rooms, small shops or service areas for residents and visitors (e.g. hair salons, convenience stores), staff offices, lobbies, atriums, cafeterias, kitchens, storage areas, hallways, basements, stairways, corridors between buildings, and elevator shafts. Open air stairwells, breezeways, and other similar areas that are not fully-enclosed should not be included in the gross floor area.

Residential Population Type

The Resident Population Type describes the specific resident population, if any, to which the multifamily housing property is marketed and/or dedicated. Select the type of housing that applies to the majority (more than 50%) of the residents.

The following options are available:
  • No specific resident population: The property is not inhabited by any dedicated population.
  • Dedicated Student: Privately owned, off-campus housing -- not affiliated with a college or university -- that is primarily occupied by undergraduate or graduate students.
  • Dedicated Military: Off-base housing primarily occupied by persons serving in or employed by the military.
  • Dedicated Senior/Independent Living: Housing that is restricted to the elderly that also provides limited programs of assistance with domestic activities (meals, housekeeping, activities, transportation, etc.). Typically, a unit in an Independent Living Community resembles a standard market unit, though the community may offer amenities or communal dining facilities not typical in multifamily apartment buildings.

    Independent Living Communities generally are not licensed and generally do not provide assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) or healthcare, such as the management of medications and assistance with bathing, dressing, toileting, ambulating, eating and other similar activities.
  • Dedicated Special Accessibility Needs: Residents living in the property are covered by the American Disabilities Act.
  • Other Dedicated housing (please specify): - Use this selection to indicate another type of dedicated resident population.
Please note that Portfolio Manager contains separate property use designations for Senior Care Communities, Residence Halls/Dormitories, and Barracks. Please refer to the definitions for these property uses to benchmark a property that is used for nursing/assisted living or as a student or military residence hall.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Restaurant

Restaurant refers to buildings used for preparation and sale of ready-to-eat food and beverages, but which do not fit in the fast food property type. Examples include fast casual, casual, and fine dining restaurants.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including kitchens, sales areas, dining areas, offices, staff break rooms, and storage areas. Gross Floor Area should not include any outdoor/exterior seating areas, but the energy use of these outdoor areas should be reported on your energy meters.

Retail Store

Retail Store refers to individual stores used to conduct the retail sale of non-food consumer goods such as clothing, books, toys, sporting goods, office supplies, hardware, and electronics. Buildings containing multiple stores should be classified as enclosed mall, lifestyle center, or strip mall.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including sales areas, storage areas, offices staff break rooms, elevators, and stairwells.

To receive an ENERGY STAR score, a Retail Store must be a single store that is at least 5,000 square feet and has an exterior entrance to the public. The ENERGY STAR score applies to: Department Stores, Discount Stores, Supercenters, Warehouse Clubs, Drug Stores, Dollar Stores, Home Center/Hardware Stores, and Apparel/Specialty Stores (e.g. books, clothing, office products, toys, home goods, and electronics). Eligible store configurations include: free standing stores; stores located in open air or strip centers (a collection of attached stores with common areas that are not enclosed); and mall anchors.

Retail configurations not eligible to receive an ENERGY STAR score include: enclosed malls; individual stores located within enclosed malls; lifestyle centers; strip malls; and individual stores that are part of a larger non-mall building (i.e. office or hotel).

Convenience Stores, Automobile Dealerships, and Restaurants are not eligible to earn an ENERGY STAR score as Retail. Supermarkets are eligible for an ENERGY STAR score under the Supermarket property type.

Note: In order to be eligible to earn ENERGY STAR certification, your building must be located in the US or its territories, or owned by the US government outside of the US.

Roller Rink

Roller Rink refers to buildings used primarily for roller-skating, inline skating/rollerblading, or skateboarding.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including the rink space, concession areas, locker rooms, retail areas, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.
Back to Top

S

School District

School District represents the administrative school district in which your property is located.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Score Card

The Score Card is a visual representation of a building’s score. It is only available for buildings which can get a score. This report would be useful to hang in a building lobby for public disclosure purposes.

Seating Capacity

Seating Capacity is the maximum total seating capacity of the main worship area(s) in a Worship Facility. If there are multiple seating configurations, please identify the maximum number that the facility can hold. This number should reflect permanent seating capacity as the facility is typically used. Note that if there is no seating at this type of worship facility, this number should reflect the number of worshipers than can be accommodated in the main worship area(s).

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Self-Storage Facility

Self-Storage Facility refers to buildings that are used for private storage. Typically, a single Self Storage Facility will contain a variety of individual units that are rented out for the purpose of storing personal belongings.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including individual storage units, administrative offices, security and maintenance areas, mechanical rooms, hallways, stairways, and elevator shafts. This should not include exterior/outdoor loading bays or docks.

Senior Care Community

Senior Care Community refers to buildings that house and provide care and assistance for elderly residents.

Gross Floor Area should include all fully-enclosed space within the exterior walls of the building(s) including individual rooms or units, wellness centers, exam rooms, community rooms, small shops or service areas for residents and visitors (e.g. hair salons, convenience stores), staff offices, lobbies, atriums, cafeterias, kitchens, storage areas, hallways, basements, stairways, corridors between buildings, and elevator shafts. Open air stairwells, breezeways, and other similar areas that are not fully-enclosed should not be included in the gross floor area.

The ENERGY STAR score for Senior Care Community applies to nursing homes (skilled nursing facilities) and assisted living facilities and is not intended for retirement communities that offer only independent living – a community with only independent living should benchmark under the Multifamily property use.

However, it is common for Senior Care Communities to include a mix of different living options, including both independent living, assisted living, and/or skilled nursing. In these situations, benchmarking guidance depends on the percent of living units designated as skilled nursing/assisted living:
  • If more than 50% of the units in a community are skilled nursing and/or assisted living, the entire property should be benchmarked as a Senior Care Community. You can use one property use to characterize all activities at the community, including any independent living that may be present.
  • If 50% or more of the units are independent living, the property should be benchmarked using both the Senior Care Community and Multifamily property uses. In this situation, the floor area of hallways and units for assisted living and any community areas specifically used to assist residents (e.g. nursing stations, exam rooms, physical therapy rooms, etc.) should be benchmarked with the Senior Care Community property use. The floor area of hallways and units for independent living along with any open common areas that are used by residents of both the independent and the nursing/assisted living units (e.g. game rooms or restaurants) should be benchmarked with the Multifamily property use.

Service and Product Provider (SPP)

Service and Product Providers are ENERGY STAR partners that offer energy services and products to help you benchmark and improve your property. These companies follow the ENERGY STAR approach to energy management and building design. They bring expertise and achievement to building owners managers seeking to benchmark and earn ENERGY STAR certification for their properties.

Shared by Contact

The "Shared by Contact" is the account that shared a particular property.

Shared by Contact - Account ID

Shared by Contact - Account ID is the unique identifier for the account that “Shared” a particular property.

Share Forward

"Share Forward" refers to the process of sharing a property that has been shared with you. In order to do this, you need to have "Share Forward" permissions.

Single Building

Single Family Home

Single Family Home refers to a standalone building with its own lot that provides living space for one household or family.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the home, including living areas, bedrooms, and finished basements and attics.

Single Store

Single Store is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property is a single store.
  • No – The property contains two or more stores.
The purpose of this question is to determine if the store is eligible for the ENERGY STAR score and certification. The ENERGY STAR score for retail is valid for single stores only. A “Single Store” could be attached to other stores (ex: an anchor store in a mall, or a big box retail store in a strip mall). But a combination of small retail stores inside a mall or office building is not a “Single Store.” See this FAQ for more.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Site Energy

Site Energy is the annual amount of all the energy your property consumes onsite, as reported on your utility bills. Use Site Energy to understand how the energy use for an individual property has changed over time.

Site Energy is available in a number of different formats:
  • Site Energy Use – The annual amount of all the energy your property consumes on-site, as reported on your utility bills.
    • Site EUI – The Site Energy Use divided by the property square foot.
    • Water/Wastewater Site EUI – For Water and Wastewater treatment plants, this is the Site Energy Use divided the total average flow through the plant.
  • Weather Normalized Site Energy –The energy use your property would have consumed during 30-year average weather conditions. For example, if 2012 was a very hot year, then your Weather Normalized Site Energy may be lower than your Site Energy Use, because you would have used less energy if it had not been so hot. It can helpful to use this weather normalized value to understand changes in energy when accounting for changes in weather. Weather Normalized Site EUI is also available (i.e. Weather Normalized Site Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).
  • Site Energy (Adjusted to Current Time Period) – This metric is only available for properties that have an ENERGY STAR score. For a given 12-month period, this metric reflects the Site Energy the property would be expected to have if its operations were the same as in the current time period. For example, if you are looking at the period ending December 2008, this metric would tell you the amount of Site Energy you would have used in 2008 if your operating conditions (weather, hours, occupants) had been the same as they are for your current time period. Much like looking at financial investments in the dollars for a specific year, this adjusted value will help you understand the change in energy when accounting for changes in operation. Adjusted Site EUI is also available (i.e. Adjusted Site Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).
  • Design Site Energy –The estimated energy associated with a design project. These estimated values are entered as annual totals for each energy type, so that a design project can be evaluated and compared with the Design Target and/or later with the property’s operational Site Energy. The Design Site EUI is also available (i.e. Design Site Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).
Finally, please note that while site energy will correspond to your utility bill, you should take care when using Site Energy metrics in properties that use multiple fuel types. In this case, EPA recommends using Source Energy Use because it also includes losses that take place during generation, transmission, and distribution of the energy used at the building. Learn More

Site Energy (Adjusted to Current Time Period)

Site Energy Use

Site EUI

Size of Electronic Score Boards

The size of Electronic Score Boards is a measure of the total area occupied by electronic signage used for scoring and related announcements, measured in square feet. This includes any electronic signage inside a venue concourse, as well as the jumbotron and other areas used to promote the event and its sponsors, and to make other announcements.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Social/Meeting Hall

Social/Meeting hall refers to buildings primarily used for public or private gatherings. This may include community group meetings, seminars, workshops, or performances. Please note that there is another property use available, Convention Center, for large exhibition and conference facilities.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including meeting rooms, auditoriums, food service areas, lobbies, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells.

Source Energy

Source Energy Use is the total amount of raw fuel that is required to operate your property. In addition to what the property consumes on-site, source energy includes losses that take place during generation, transmission, and distribution of the energy, thereby enabling a complete assessment of energy consumption resulting from building operations. For this reason, Source EUI is the best way to quantify the energy performance of commercial buildings. Use it to understand the complete energy impact of your property, and to compare the energy performance of properties across your portfolio. Learn More

Source Energy is available in a number of different formats:

  • Source Energy Use – The total amount of all the raw fuel required to operate your property, including losses that take place during generation, transmission, and distribution of the energy.
    • Source EUI – The Source Energy Use divided by the property square foot.
    • Water/Wastewater Source EUI – For Water and Wastewater treatment plants, this metric is the Source Energy Use divided by the total average flow through the plant.
  • Weather Normalized Source Energy –The source energy use your property would have consumed during 30-year average weather conditions. For example, if 2012 was a very hot year, then your Weather Normalized Source Energy may be lower than your Source Energy Use, because you would have used less energy if it had not been so hot. It can helpful to use this weather normalized value to understand changes in energy when accounting for changes in weather. Weather Normalized Source EUI is also available (i.e. Weather Normalized Source Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).

  • Source Energy (Adjusted to Current Time Period) – This metric is only available for properties that have an ENERGY STAR score. For a given 12-month period, this metric reflects the Source Energy Use the property would be expected to have if its operations were the same as in the current time period. For example, if you are looking at the period ending December 2008, this metric would tell you the amount of Source Energy you would have used in 2008 if your operating conditions (weather, hours, occupants) had been the same as they are for your current time period. Much like looking at financial investments in the dollars for a specific year, this adjusted value will help you understand the change in energy when accounting for changes in operation. Adjusted Source EUI is also available (i.e. Adjusted Source Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).

  • Design Source Energy –The estimated source energy associated with a design project. These estimated values are entered as annual totals for each energy type, so that a design project can be evaluated and compared with the Design Target and/or later with the property’s operational Source Energy. Design Source EUI is also available (i.e. Design Source Energy divided by property size or by flow through a water/wastewater treatment plant).

Source Energy (Adjusted to Current Time Period)

Source Energy Use

Source EUI

Stadium (Closed)

Stadium (Closed) refers to structures with a permanent or retractable roof which are used primarily for professional or collegiate sports and entertainment events. Examples of events held in closed stadiums include baseball and football games, and concerts. Closed Stadiums usually have capacities of 25,000 seats or more and are often characterized by multiple concourses and concession areas.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including concourse space on which workers or guests can walk, concession areas, retail stores, restaurants, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, kitchens, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. The footprint of the playing field should also be included in the gross floor area.

Stadium (Open)

Stadium (Open) refers to structures used primarily for professional or collegiate sports and entertainment events in which the playing field is not covered and is exposed to the outside. Examples of events held in open stadiums include baseball, football, and soccer games, and concerts. Open Stadiums usually have capacities of 5,000 seats or more and are often characterized by multiple concourses and concession areas.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including concourse space on which workers or guests can walk, concession areas, retail stores, restaurants, administrative/office areas, employee break rooms, kitchens, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. The footprint of the playing field should also be included in the gross floor area.

Standard ID

A Standard ID is a special type of Property ID with a set name. These IDs are associated with local legislation, national campaigns, or other large benchmarking activities. To enter a Standard ID, select the ID name from the dropdown list and enter your value. This is the list of Standard IDs in Portfolio Manager:
  • Atlanta Building ID (ABID) – A unique six-digit code assigned by the City of Atlanta that identifies all properties required to report annual energy performance to the City of Atlanta per the Atlanta Commercial Buildings Energy Efficiency Ordinance. When there are multiple buildings on a single parcel, the ABID is the property ID plus an underscore (“_”) and letter to denote each building (e.g. 012345_a).
  • Austin Building ID - A unique number assigned by the City of Austin that is based on the Property ID (TCAD or WCAD ID) with an added suffix at the end to identify the multiple buildings associated with one property.
  • Austin Property ID - A County code that identifies owned properties such as Real Estate Properties and Business Personal properties by Account Number, Owner’s Name or Property Address, the County’s centralized real property database. Based on the property’s county location, the property ID will consist of a Travis Central Appraisal District ID (TCAD ID) or Williamson Central Appraisal District (WCAD ID).
  • Boulder Energy Reporting ID - A number that uniquely identifies buildings or groups of buildings required to report energy performance under Boulder’s Building Performance Ordinance.
  • BOMA BESt Building ID - A unique number assigned to each building pursuing BOMA BESt certification. In the case of a complex, each building is assigned its own unique BOMA BESt Building ID.
  • Boston Energy Reporting ID - A number that uniquely identifies buildings or parcels required to report energy performance under Boston’s Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance.
  • Cambridge Building Energy Reporting ID - A number that uniquely identifies buildings required to report energy performance under Cambridge’s Building Energy Use and Disclosure Ordinance.
  • Chicago Energy Benchmarking ID - A unique identification number assigned by the City of Chicago to identify buildings that are required to report benchmarking information, as prescribed by Chicago’s Building Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance (Municipal Code of Chicago, Chapter 18-14).
  • CoStar Property ID - A unique number assigned to each building in CoStar. CoStar is a resource for verified commercial real estate information, including space for lease, property for sale, property and market analytics, and quarterly market reports.
  • District of Columbia Building Unique ID - The code established by the District Department of the Environment (DDOE) for unique building identification, derived from the District Office of Tax and Revenue's Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal (CAMA) database, and published by DDOE. When there is a one-to-one match between building and tax lot, this is the property's Square Suffix Lot (SSL) or Parcel number. For condominium buildings, this is the Square Suffix + Regime number. When there are multiple buildings on a site, this is the unique site identifier plus a letter code for each building.
  • District of Columbia Real Property Unique ID - The District of Columbia Government code for real property identification, as determined by the District Office of Tax and Revenue and housed in the Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal (CAMA) database, the District's centralized real property database. For most properties, this is the property's Square Suffix Lot (SSL) or Parcel number. For condominium buildings, this is the Square Suffix + Regime number.
  • Green Globes CIEB Project ID - A unique number used to identify every building registered for Green Globes for Continual Improvement of Existing Buildings (GG CIEB) from the Green Building Initiative (GBI). GBI assigns the Green Globes CIEB Project ID to each building at the time of building registration in the GG CIEB online assessment module.
  • Green Globes NC Project ID - A unique number used to identify every project registered for the Green Globes for New Construction (GG NC) assessment from the Green Building Initiative (GBI). GBI assigns the GBI New Construction Project ID to each project at the time of project registration in the GG NC online assessment module.
  • HUD Property REMS ID - The Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Real Estate Management System (REMS) ID is a unique, numeric, 10-digit identifying number assigned by HUD to each property within HUD’s multifamily portfolio.
  • Kansas City Building Reporting ID - A unique building code assigned by the City of Kansas City Missouri that identifies buildings reporting benchmarking information per the Energy Empowerment Ordinance (Ordinance No 150299).
  • LEED Canada Project ID - A unique number to identify projects registered for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) recognition from the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC). CaGBC assigns each project (building or neighborhood) this unique ID at the time of registration through the CaGBC website.
  • LEED US Project ID - A unique number to identify projects registered for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) recognition from the US Green Building Council (USGBC). USGBC assigns each project (building or neighborhood) this unique ID at the time of registration in LEED Online.
  • Minneapolis Building ID -The Building ID number identifies unique buildings within the Minneapolis property information and assessment database.
  • Minneapolis Property ID (PID) - A 13 Digit unique identifier assigned by Hennepin County which can be found on your property tax or assessment statement.
  • Montgomery County, MD Building ID (MBID) -The MBID is a number that uniquely identifies buildings required to report energy performance under Montgomery County, Maryland’s Benchmarking Law. In the common case where there is only one building on a single parcel, it is the Parcel Identification Number/Tax ID. When there are multiple buildings on a single parcel, the MBID is the Parcel Identification Number/Tax ID plus an underscore (“_”) and letter to denote each building (e.g. 01234567_a). When a single building sits upon multiple parcels, all Parcel Identification Number/Tax IDs should be listed, separated by commas.
  • NYC Borough Block and Lot (BBL) - New York City's 10-digit identifier representing a property’s borough, block and lot number.
  • NYC Building Identification Number (BIN) - A seven-digit Building Identification Number (BIN) assigned to each building in New York City, located at the top of each building’s Property Profile Overview screen on the New York City Department of Buildings’ Building Information System (BIS).
  • Philadelphia Building ID - The Building ID number that identifies unique buildings within the Philadelphia property information and assessment database.
  • Portland Building ID – A unique code assigned by the City of Portland that identifies all buildings required to report annual energy performance to the City of Portland per the Portland Commercial Building Energy.
  • REALPac Energy Benchmarking Program Building Name - A unique name used to identify each building with an energy profile entered into the REALpac Energy Normalization Database. Users create their own REALpac Building Name when they save data into the Database.
  • San Francisco Building ID - A unique building code assigned by the City of San Francisco that identifies all buildings required to report annual energy performance to the City of San Francisco per the Existing Commercial Building Energy Performance Ordinance.
  • Seattle Building Energy Benchmarking Reporting ID - A unique building code assigned by the City of Seattle that identifies all buildings required to report annual energy performance to the City of Seattle per the Energy Benchmarking and Reporting ordinance.
  • State of Washington Unique Facilities Identifier (UFI) - A unique number that identifies assets owned or leased by the State of Washington, in the Office of Financial Management (OFM) Facility Inventory System (FIS), which is the State of Washington’s centralized real property database.
  • U.S. Agency Designated Covered Facility ID - This is a standard ID within the US Federal Government. This ID is the agency-assigned internal covered facility identifier used in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA ) 432 Compliance Tracking System (CTS). This identifier provides the link between CTS and building data entered into Portfolio Manager and must be unique across the top-tier U.S. department or agency.
  • USDA Property AMAS ID - The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Automated Multi-Family Housing Accounting System (AMAS) ID is a unique 12-digit alpha-numeric identifier tag assigned by USDA to each multifamily housing property within USDA’s portfolio.
  • U.S. Federal Real Property Unique Identifier - The U.S. Government ID code that identifies owned, leased, or otherwise managed assets in the Federal Real Property Profile, the Federal Government’s centralized real property database. In Portfolio Manager the Real Property Unique Identifier is entered by the user for individual building assets.

Start and End Bill Dates

The Start Date and End Date correspond to each bill you receive for the meter. Many utilities use the same date for the End Date of one cycle and the Start Date of the next cycle.
  • The Start Date is the date (XX/XX/XXXX) of the first day of the billing cycle.
  • The End Date is the date (XX/XX/XXXX) of the last day of the billing cycle.

Statement of Energy Design Intent (SEDI)

The Statement of Energy Design Intent (SEDI) is a report that provides an overview of your design metrics. It is also used for Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR applications. The SEDI is available from both the Design Tab and outside of Portfolio Manager in Target Finder. Sample SEDI.

Statement of Energy Performance (SEP)

The Statement of Energy Performance (SEP) is a one-page report summarizing the energy consumption for a property. A Verifying Professional can sign and stamp it to verify the validity of the data, if needed. The SEP is not needed for applying for ENERGY STAR certification. Some localities may require it as part of local legislation. Sample SEP.

Strip Mall

Strip mall refers to buildings comprising more than one retail store, restaurant, or other business, in an open-air configuration where each establishment has an exterior entrance to the public and there are no internal walkways.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including retail stores, offices, restaurants, storage areas, staff break rooms, and stairwells. Do not include any exterior spaces such as vehicle parking areas.

Note that individual stores within strip malls may be eligible to receive an ENERGY STAR score if they are over 5,000 square feet in size and have an exterior entrance to the public.

Student Seating Capacity

Student Seating Capacity is the maximum number of students for which a school was designed. This should include the seating capacity of the entire school. If portable classrooms have been added to your school, include the capacity of these classrooms, as they expand the overall capacity of your school.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Supermarket/Grocery Store

Supermarket/Grocery Store refers to buildings used for the retail sale of primarily food and beverage products, and which may include small amounts of preparation and sale of ready-to-eat food. Buildings where the primary business is the onsite preparation and sale of ready-to-eat food should use one of the Restaurant property types.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including the sales floor, offices, storage areas, kitchens, staff break rooms, and stairwells.

Supplemental Heating

Supplemental Heating is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The parking garage has a heating system to pre-heat ventilation air and/or maintain a minimum temperature during winter months.
  • No – The parking garage does not include any heating system.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Surgery Center Floor Area

Surgery Center Floor Area is the total size of the surgery center within the medical office building. It includes both clinical and nonclinical spaces such as operating rooms, pre/post operative recovery rooms, waiting rooms, and administration.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Swimming Pool

Swimming Pool refers to any heated swimming pools located either inside or outside. To enter a swimming pool, a specific pool size must be selected. In order to enter buildings associated with a Swimming Pool, the main property use must be entered (e.g., K-12 School, Hotel, Fitness Center/Health Club/Gym, etc).
Back to Top

T

Target Values

Target Values are the performance metrics associated with an established target (goal) for your property. Portfolio Manager has both a regular target and a target for the property design:
  • Target – This is the target for comparison relative to actual operation. Once your target is established, metrics such as Site EUI, Source EUI, GHG Emissions, and Energy Cost are evaluated for your target conditions. This will enable you to compare your actual energy use with your target and track your progress. This target can be expressed in one of three ways:
    • Target ENERGY STAR Score
    • Target Percent Better than National Median
    • Target Percent Better than Property Baseline

  • Design Target – This is the target for comparison relative to your design plans (estimated design energy and design property use details). Once your design target is established metrics such as Site EUI, Source EUI, GHG Emissions, and Energy Cost are evaluated for your target conditions. This will enable you to compare your design energy use with your design target, and determine whether your planned design meets your design target goals. The design target is expressed in one of two ways:
    • Target ENERGY STAR Score
    • Target Percent Better than National Median

Temporary Data flag

Temporary Data Flag is a Yes/No flag that indicates whether temporary values have been applied to any of the Property Use Details (such as hours, workers, or computers).
  • Yes - One or more temporary value was used in the Property Use Details.
  • No – There are no temporary values for any Property Use Details.
You can view this metric for all properties in a report, or for each individual Property Use Type (Office, Retail, K-12 School).

Temp Title

Temp Text

Tertiary Care

Tertiary Care is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The hospital provides medical care beyond the standard secondary level. Examples of tertiary care include: Level I trauma centers, highly specialized medical care such as organ transplant centers or prenatal/neonatal intensive care centers.
  • No – The hospital does not provide tertiary medical care.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Test Environment

Test Property

The “Test” designation is a way for you to indicate that a property is not a real building. Test properties can be used to try out new features in Portfolio Manager without touching your real data, or to train others on how to use Portfolio Manager. You can mark a property as a “Test” building on the Details tab, under Basic Information, by setting the Construction Status to "Test."

Third Party Certification

Third Party Certifications (e.g. LEED, Green Globes) may be tracked within Portfolio Manager. This field includes a list of any third part certifications that have been selected.

Third Party Certification Date Achieved

The date a property achieves third-party green building certification. If more than one third-party certifications is achieved, then all dates will be displayed when this metric is selected for a report.

Third Party Certification Date Anticipated

The date a property is expected to achieve third-party green building certification. If more than one third-party certification is expected, then all dates will be displayed when this metric is selected for a report.

Total Emissions

Total Number of Residential (Living) Units

The Total Number of Residential Living Units is a count of all individual residential living units or apartments, including both occupied and unoccupied units.

In addition, please note these specific property type considerations:
  • Multifamily Housing – The Total Number of Residential Living Units should count all individual private apartments/condominiums. There are three additional Property Use Details, which break this total into three different categories, according to building height. If your property has only one building, or if all buildings are of the same height, then you should enter “zero” for the other two categories. Portfolio Manager requires that the sum of these three values equal your Total Number of Residential Living Units:
    • Number of Residential Living Units in a Low-rise Setting (1-4 stories) – This includes all units located in individual buildings that are 1 to 4 stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this height range (e.g. if Wing A is 6 stories and Wing B is 3 stories, only units in Wing B would be counted here).
    • Number of Residential Living Units in a Mid-rise Setting (5-9 stories) – This includes all units located in individual buildings that are 5 to 9 stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this height range (e.g. if Wing A is 6 stories and Wing B is 3 stories, only units in Wing A would be counted here).
    • Number of Residential Living Units in a High-rise Setting (10 or more stories) – This includes all units located in individual buildings that are 10 or more stories in height, as well as units located in wings/portions of larger buildings that fall in this range (e.g. if Wing A is 10 stories and Wing B is 5 stories, only units in Wing A would be counted here).
  • Senior Care Communities - For communities where residents have individual rooms that open onto central corridors, each room is considered a single unit, even if there are two or more beds per room. For communities with apartment-type living units each apartment is considered a single unit. Do not count individual rooms within apartments or townhouses.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Transportation Terminal/Station

Transportation Terminal/Station applies to buildings used primarily for accessing public or private transportation. This includes train stations, bus stations, airports, and seaports. These terminals include areas for ticket purchases, and embarkation/disembarkation, and may also include public waiting areas with restaurants and other concessions.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including boarding areas, waiting areas, administrative space, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, restaurants, cafeterias, stairways, atria, elevator shafts, and storage areas. This should not include any exterior spaces associated with the terminals, such as drop-off areas, outdoor platforms, or outdoor loading docks/bays.

Type of Laundry Facility

Type of Laundry Facility indicates the type of laundry that is processed within an onsite laundry facility. This is intended to reflect commercial processing of laundry associated with property operations, not individual pay-per-use machines that may be operated by guests/visitors. You may select one of the following for types:
  • No laundry facility
  • Linens only (e.g., bed/table linens
  • Terry only (e.g., towels, bathrobes)
  • Both linens and terry
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.
Back to Top

U

U.S. Federal Campus

A U.S. government designation associated with a campus or installation owned or leased by the federal government. This designation is used to identify groups of buildings typically in the same geographic location. It could be the name of a federal campus, or it could be an alphanumeric sequence, like the Installation or Sub-Installation Identifier from the US Federal Real Property Profile, the federal government’s centralized real property database.

UPS System Redundancy

UPS System Redundancy describes the redundant capacity of the Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) in a Data Center. Redundant components are typically required to accommodate IT loads in the event of equipment failure. The specific level of redundancy will depend on your particular Data Center.

If there is no UPS system, indicate the redundancy for the PDU Meters that support the IT load. If there are multiple systems operating at different levels of redundancy, choose the option that applies to the majority of the IT load.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Urgent Care/Clinic/Other Outpatient

Urgent Care Center/Clinic/Other Outpatient Office refers to buildings used to treat patients, usually on an unscheduled, walk-in basis, who have an injury or illness that requires immediate care but is not serious enough to warrant a visit to an emergency department.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, exam rooms, waiting rooms, atriums, employee break rooms and kitchens, rest rooms, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.

Utility Provider

An organization which provides water and/or power, such as electricity or natural gas, to customers. Utilities are allowed certain monopoly rights due to the practical need to service entire geographic areas with one system, but they are regulated by state, county and/or city public utility commissions under state laws.
Back to Top

V

Veterinary Office

A Veterinary Office refers to buildings used for the medical care and treatment of animals.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s) including offices, exam rooms, waiting rooms, atriums, employee break rooms and kitchens, rest rooms, elevator shafts, stairways, mechanical rooms, and storage areas.

Vocational School

Vocational School refers to buildings primarily designed to teach skilled trades to students, including trade and technical schools. Typically vocational schools are commonly post-secondary education, consisting of 1-2 years of technical/trade training.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including classrooms, administrative space, conference rooms, kitchens used by staff, lobbies, cafeterias, gymnasiums, auditoriums, laboratory classrooms, stairways, elevator shafts, and storage areas.
Back to Top

W

Wastewater Treatment Plant

Wastewater Treatment Plant refers to facilities designed to treat municipal wastewater. The level of treatment at a plant will vary based on the BOD limits and the specific processes involved. This property use is intended for primary, secondary, and advanced treatment facilities with or without nutrient removal. Treatment processes may include biological, chemical, and physical treatment. This property use does not apply to drinking water treatment and distribution facilities.

Gross Floor Area should include all areas within the physical structures at the plant including treatment areas, administrative offices, stairways, hallways and mechanical rooms. The Gross Floor Area should not include any exterior portions of the facility, such as retention or settling ponds.

Although not typically used for normalization at plants, Gross Floor Area is a required system input for all properties.

To receive an ENERGY STAR score, your Wastewater Treatment Plant must have a daily flow of at least 0.6 Million Gallons per Day (MGD).

Water/Wastewater Site EUI

Water/Wastewater Source EUI

Water Cost (All Water Sources)

The water cost is the annual cost associated with a given 12-month period. Water cost is available for each water type and also as an aggregated value across all water types.

Water Use

Within Portfolio Manager you can track four water sources:
  • Alternative Water Generated Onsite – Water that is not obtained from a surface water source, groundwater source, nor purchased reclaimed water from a third party. It can include rainwater or stormwater harvested onsite, sump pump water harvesting, gray water, air-cooling condensate, reject water from water purification systems, water reclaimed onsite, or water derived from other water reuse strategies.
  • Municipally Supplied Potable Water – Water that is of sufficient quality for human consumption and that is obtained from public water systems that are classified, permitted, and approved for human consumption.
  • Municipally Supplied Reclaimed Water – Wastewater treatment plant effluent purchased from a public water system, which has been diverted for beneficial uses, such as irrigation, that substitute the use of an existing freshwater source.
  • Other Water Sources– Water that is obtained from natural freshwater sources that are not municipally supplied (including surface and groundwater systems such as onsite wells, lakes, streams, etc.), and any other water source not fitting one of the above categories.
Each of these water sources can be tracked in one of three types of meters: Indoor, Outdoor, or Mixed (a meter that includes both Indoor & Outdoor).
  • Municipally Supplied Potable Water – Indoor Use
  • Municipally Supplied Potable Water – Outdoor Use
  • Municipally Supplied Potable Water – Mixed Indoor/Outdoor Use
  • Municipally Supplied Reclaimed Water – Indoor Use
  • Municipally Supplied Reclaimed Water – Outdoor Use
  • Municipally Supplied Reclaimed Water – Mixed Indoor/Outdoor Use
  • Alternative Water Generated Onsite – Indoor Use
  • Alternative Water Generated Onsite – Outdoor Use
  • Alternative Water Generated Onsite – Mixed Indoor/Outdoor Use
  • Other Water Sources – Indoor Use
  • Other Water Sources – Outdoor Use
  • Other Water Sources – Mixed Indoor/Outdoor Use
Each of the four types also has an Indoor Intensity metric, which is the indoor water use per square foot of the building:
  • Municipally Supplied Potable Water - Indoor Intensity (gal/ft²)
  • Municipally Supplied Reclaimed Water – Indoor Intensity (gal/ft²)
  • Alternative Water Generated Onsite – Indoor Intensity (gal/ft²)
  • Other Water Sources – Indoor Intensity (gal/ft²)
These are also metrics which add up subtotals of water use:
  • Water Use (All Water Sources) – sum of all water meters
  • Indoor Water Use (All Water Sources) - sum of all Indoor water meters
  • Outdoor Water Use (All Water Sources) - sum of all Outdoor water meters

Weather Normalized Metrics

Weather-normalized metrics, which are automatically calculated in Portfolio Manager, are adjusted for the actual weather in your area. For example, if your area has a hotter than usual summer, your metrics will be adjusted because you will have to use more energy in this situation. Weather normalized metrics ensure that there won’t be a penalty for that hot summer because not all metrics are weather normalized. For more information, see this Technical Reference document.

Weather Normalized Site Energy

Weather Normalized Source Energy

Weather Station

The weather station is the monitoring station that EPA assigns within Portfolio Manager to determine reference weather conditions at your property. The station is identified by both its name and World Meteorological Organization (WMO) ID. EPA obtains all of the data for these stations from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). For more information on how we account for weather in metrics, please refer to our weather calculation methodology document.

Web Services

Web services describes the application programming interface (API) used to exchange data with Portfolio Manager. Organizations that exchange data use web services to regularly sync your data with Portfolio Manager and export your metrics out of Portfolio Manager. There are two “environments” in which organizations that exchange data can use web services:
  • Test environment – The test environment is open to anyone and is used by developers who are testing the web services API.
  • Live environment – After receiving approval from EPA, organizations can use web services to exchange data directly with actual Portfolio Manager accounts.
More information about web services.

Weekday Operation

Weekday Operation is a count of the number of weekdays (Monday through Friday) that a Worship Facility is open. Because most Worship Facilities include weekend activities, this count reflects weekdays only, so the maximum number is 5 days. The count should include all week days when the Worship Facility is open for religious services, choir practice, administrative use, committee meetings, classes, or other activities.

If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Weekend Operation

Weekend Operation is entered as either Yes or No.
  • Yes – The property includes regular activities on the weekend beyond the scope of maintenance, cleaning, and security personnel. Weekend activity could include any time when the property is used for classes, performances, or other school or community activities. The Yes selection is appropriate for any property that is open on one or both days of the weekend during one or more season of the year.
  • No – The property does not include regular activities on the weekend beyond the scope of maintenance, cleaning, and security personnel.
If your property is in the design phase, use your best estimate for the intended conditions when the property is fully operational.

Weekly Operating Hours

The Weekly Operating Hours is the total number of hours per week that the property is occupied by the majority of the employees. It does not include hours when the property is occupied only by maintenance, security, or other support personnel. The Weekly Operating Hours is not the same as the hours during which the HVAC equipment is run, but rather should be based on the hours during which your property is actually occupied by the majority of the tenants.

For properties with a schedule that varies during the year, Weekly Operating Hours refers to the schedule most often followed.

If your property is still in the design phase, this value should reflect the best estimate of conditions that will be in effect when the property is fully operational.

In addition, please note these specific property type considerations:
  • Retail Store – The Weekly Operating Hours should reflect the hours when the store is open to customers. .
  • Worship Facility – The Weekly Operating Hours should reflect hours when the facility is typically open for operation, which may include worship services, choir practice, administrative use, committee meetings, classes, or other activities.
  • Office and Financial Office – It is possible that these hours may correspond to hours specified within a lease, during which the owner is required to provide the leasee with conditioned space. However, this number should never include additional HVAC startup or shutdown time.
  • Non-Refrigerated Warehouse, Refrigerated Warehouse, and Distribution Center – Weekly Operating Hours should reflect only hours when workers are present at the Warehouse.

Wholesale Club/Supercenter

Wholesale Club/Supercenter refers to buildings used to conduct the retail sale of a wide variety of merchandise, typically in bulk quantities. Merchandise may include food, clothing, office supplies, furniture, electronics, books, sporting goods, toys, and hardware.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within the building(s), including the sales floor, offices, storage areas, kitchens, staff break rooms, elevators, and stairwells.

Worship Facility

Worship Facility refers to buildings that are used as places of worship. This includes churches, temples, mosques, synagogues, meetinghouses, or any other buildings that primarily function as a place of religious worship.

Gross Floor Area should include all areas inside the building that includes the primary worship area, including food preparation, community rooms, classrooms, and supporting areas such as restrooms, storage areas, hallways, and elevator shafts.

The ENERGY STAR score for Worship Facilities applies to buildings that function as the primary place of worship and not to other buildings that may be associated with a religious organization, such as living quarters, schools, or buildings used primarily for other community activities. To receive an ENERGY STAR score, a Worship facility must have at least 25 seats, but cannot have more than 4,000.
Back to Top

Y

Year Built

This is the year in which your property was constructed. If your property has undergone a complete renovation that included gutting and rebuilding the interior, then you can indicate the date of this renovation as the year built. The year built is not used to calculate the ENERGY STAR Score; it is simply for property information. If you don't know the exact year the property was built, enter an estimate.

Year Ending Date

The Year Ending Date is the last day of a 12-month period (called a Metric Year) which a set of metrics are based on. A Metric Year starts on the first day of one month, and ends 12 months later on the last day of the last month (ex: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014). There are 12 possible Year Ending Dates in each calendar year (Jan 31, Feb 28, Mar 31, etc). All Metrics in Portfolio Manager are calculated based on 12 full calendar months of data. The 12-month period associated with a given metric is often represented by the Year Ending Date which is the last day of the 12-month period. For example, if your Year Ending Date is 12/31/2012, your metrics would be based on the calendar year of 2012.

Your Property’s Buildings

When you enter a new property, there are 3 options to explain Your Property’s Buildings:
  • Partial Building - This could be a single floor or suite in a building. A partial building can benchmark and get a score, but partial buildings are not eligible for certification.
  • Single Building - This is a free-standing building.
  • Multi-Building Campus - This is the “Parent” Property for a campus or collection of “child” buildings. For example, a college campus with 10 individual buildings, or an office park with 4 towers. You can optionally add one (or all) of the individual “child” buildings as separate properties. You may find it useful to benchmark at the campus level if you have a group of buildings that are centrally located and managed. There are four property types where a score and certification are available for a campus as a whole (hotels, K-12 schools, hospitals, and senor care facilities).
Back to Top

Z

Zoo

Zoo refers to buildings used primarily to provide habitat to live animals and which may include public or private viewing and educational programs.

Gross Floor Area should include all space within all fully enclosed buildings, including, habitats, visitor viewing areas, theaters, classrooms, food service areas, retail stores, veterinary offices, exhibit space, administrative/office space, mechanical rooms, storage areas, elevator shafts, and stairwells. Areas not in fully enclosed buildings, such as outdoor habitats, open-air theaters, walkways, and landscaped areas should not be included in the Gross Floor Area.
Back to Top